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Wiki Wiki Chef Loco Moco

Ah yes, it was only a matter of time before someone figured out how to put the “instant” in Loco Moco. Shoots, if they could do it for ramen noodles, why not a hamburger patty and gravy, right?

Here we have the Wiki Wiki Chef Loco Moco style seasoned patty with gravy, a product of Redondo’s, famous for their Portuguese brand sausage. It’s sort of a “kit”, where all you need to complete the dish is a bowl of hot rice and egg to top it. 

Wiki Wiki Chef
Aloha! Wiki Wiki means quick and fast in Hawaii. Now, we are introducing the Wiki Wiki Chef line of products, a quick and easy way to prepare a delicious meal at home! Wiki Wiki Chef is the perfect meal solution for people on the go! 

There’s actually two products in this line-up, where the other one is the same, except the gravy is a demi-glace. In case you don’t know what a demi-glace is, it’s traditionally made with veal stock, however it can vary from beef and/or chicken stock, plus a number of other ingredients and technical cooking steps. This, all for a richer, full-bodied flavor. We’ll review the demi-glace Loco Moco in a follow-up post. And yes, Loco Moco is all about da’ gravy, baby! 

Interestingly, this “instant” Loco Moco burger patty includes both beef and pork. I always thought the traditional Loco Moco was an all-beef patty. For you hamburger steak fans, fillers are important, which the Loco Moco is essentially a hamburger steak plate with an egg on top. For patty filler, Wiki Wiki Chef’s Loco Moco has panko in it, along with dried onion flakes and “seasonings”. I remember my grandmother used to put rice in ground beef as a filler. Brah, small keed time, she go! 

To heat this up, you can either nuke it, or my preferred method, on the stovetop in a pot of boiling water, right in the vacuum-sealed packet it’s sold in. 

I bought these at Don Quijote, merchandised in the refrigerator section where all the Portuguese Sausage and Hawaiian food fresh products are sold. It was $3.59 each. Not bad.

Along with the hot rice and fried egg on top, I also added some sauteed sweet Ewa Onion, green onion garnish and a twist or two of fresh cracked black peppah. 

Speaking of eggs, Loco Moco is all about it, so insist on local, fresh eggs, where here I used a Kalei egg. I was going to put two eggs, but I thought it might cover too much of the burger patty for a good photo, so opted with one. Sunny side up of course. You want the runny yolk mixing in with da’ brown gravy. you know da’ rules, braddah cuz! 

As instructed, I boiled the Loco Moco packet in water for 3 minutes exactly, then let it sit in the hot water as I fried the Kalei egg. Also equally important, a bowl of hot steaming white rice, made fresh. 

Opening it up, no surprises yet. Only thing, the plastic packet is very hot to handle, requiring me to basically semi-burn my hands. I tried handling it with tongs and dish cloth, but forget it. Add to that, you must squeeze the hot packet to extract every last drop of that precious gravy.

OK, now this is where I’m disappointed, as the burger patty doesn’t have any sear marks on it. What’s up with that? Auwe! It looks like a run-of-the-mill TV dinner Salisbury steak. The patty is quite large, so I’ll give it that. It measures exactly 4¼”Lx3½”Wx1/2″D, with net weight of the patty and gravy at 6.5 ounces.  

The gravy has a nice ‘n thick consistency, however it’s lighter than I hoped it would be, as I like my Loco Moco gravy to have a rich dark brown tone to it, indicating it has an intense beefy flavor. 

Add on some sauteed sweet Ewa onion and a couple twists of fresh cracked black peppah. 

Finishing off the kit, it’s topped with a “pride” sunny side up egg and green onion garnish. Like dot. (why I’m throwing in Filipino, don’t ask lol) 

Angle B.

Angle C. 

Going in for the money shot and sample session, notice the cross-cut of the patty how dense it looks. Loco Moco the way I interpret it should look like a hamburger patty, where as this looks more like a sausage patty. And you know what? That’s what it tastes like! WTH? It’s like Redondo’s transposed their Portuguese Sausage, sans the strong spices and disguised it as a hamburger patty. It has this weird spice flavoring in it. I can’t tell what it is except for as the package says, dried onion flakes, but it just tastes weird. Like, you remember the hamburger steak they served in elementary public school? Kinda’ like that. It’s like an “institutional” burger patty. Same for the texture, where it’s dense and spongy. 

The gravy is a disappointment as well, not having nearly as much rich beef flavor as I was hoping. The lack of sear marks on the burger patty also means lack of that char flavor in the gravy as well. I’ll put it this way: I prefer McCormick’s packaged brown gravy over this one.


Liliha Bakery (Nimitz) Loco Moco – $10.50

The last Loco Moco I had prior to this was from Liliha Bakery on Nimitz Highway, and that was by far the best one yet. The tasty all-beef burger was flame grilled with great sear marks, and the gravy was killahz! Best Loco Moco gravy I’ve had yet! 

In contrast, I hate to say it, but this Loco Moco kit is not good at all. Redondo’s Wiki Wiki Chef needs to get back in the kitchen and rework this recipe. Namely lose the pork in that patty and sear the dang thing! And work on that gravy, because as it stands, it’s not good. It’s not bad, but not good.

I sure hope the Demi Glace Loco Moco I’ll review shortly will bring redemption, because it sure needs it! 

What? Redondo’s Wiki Wiki Chef Loco Moco Style Seasoned Patty with Gravy
Where did you get it and how much? Don Quijote Kaheka, $3.59 regular price
Big Shaka to: Reasonable price and decent size single serving portion. Long shelf life in refrigerator. Gravy has good texture. Made in Hawaii. Hope that the demi glace version will bring redemption. Hope is always good. 
No shaka to: burger patty lacks any sear marks or “crustification”, and overall tastes weird, with a strange spongy texture as well. Like a cheap TV dinner Salisbury steak. Gravy lacks beefy depth and tastes odd too. Overall like this is something served in a public school cafeteria, not from your favorite neighborhood drive-in. 
The Tasty Island rating:

1 SPAM Musubi (average, meaning it’s edible, filling and that’s about it). 


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29 thoughts on “Wiki Wiki Chef Loco Moco

  • May 6, 2018 at 5:08 pm
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    Yuck.

    Looks like Swanson Salisbury Steak. I think I actually saw that at DQ yesterday when I was checking out the refrigerated stuff. What WAS Ono was the pound of Limu Ahi Poke made from fresh I got there (along w $88 bucks of other stuff) and proceeded to WHACK down in about 15 min when I got back to the hotel. They ran out of rooms when I got in late and gave me a WHOLE apartment instead… So I’ve got a full kitchen I’m taking advantage of… :D

    Best Regards

    Haru

    Reply
    • May 6, 2018 at 5:25 pm
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      Haru, score on the hotel accommodations! Looking forward to more foodie reports of your visit back home!

      Reply
      • May 6, 2018 at 5:44 pm
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        Stopped off at Alicia’s later in the morning to get some crispy roast pork but they had so many cars jammed around the building it looked like an undercover 5-0 raid… DQ had Spam on sale so I got the max 5 cans of the flavors we don’t get on the ML. Tocino, Teri, Garlic, Portuguese Sausage.

        Fried the Teri this morning with eggs and rice but read your review on it and cut 4 thin slices instead of 2 thick and cooked very slowly over low heat till they were crispy and caramelized. Tasted good but as you noted – hot dog like texture. Going to do Purity Hot Portuguese sausage tomorrow. Think I’ll do Gyotaku for lunch.

        Best Regards!

        Haru

        Reply
        • May 6, 2018 at 10:22 pm
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          Haru,

          I would recommend the Crispy Roast Pork from Chun Wah Kam near Ala Moana Center. Make sure to grab some hot chinese mustard and shoyu (free) for dippin’. Also order a couple baked manapua, half moon and pork hash while there.

          Reply
          • May 7, 2018 at 7:48 am
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            Oh Yeah! And some of their fried noodles… I actually make pretty good hash and crispy gau gee – keep small service portions of the filling on hand in the freezer so I can make em quick when in the mood!

            Mahalo!

            Haru

        • May 7, 2018 at 10:05 am
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          Haru,

          You gotta’ try this Dry Aku Poke from Tamura’s Tavern in Restaurant Row (same owner as all the other Tamura’s Supermarkets). It’s pretty expensive at $24 per pound (IIRC), but so, ono! The dry aku is tossed with what tastes like shoyu and a little mirin, along with some black pepper, goma and green onion. This is absolutely one of the best poke I’ve ever had, and different because it’s dry aku, not soft fresh ahi. My friend shared this with me just a few days ago. Winnahz!

          Tamura's Dry Aku Poke
          Tamura’s Dry Aku Poke

          Tamura's Dry Aku Poke
          Tamura’s Dry Aku Poke

          Reply
  • May 6, 2018 at 7:28 pm
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    Pomai,

    WTH!!!!! BETTER YOU THAN ME!! BRAVE PERSON POMAI! In the military we called that mystery meat.

    I want you to get all your readers to write Redondo’s Wiki Wiki Chef and thank them for setting up public food poisoning.

    🍔 There is a sell by date but no use by date. How long is this product suppose to last in your refrigerator? Is it like a Mickey “D” burger that never dies because of so much chemicals in it?

    🍔 90 seconds cook time in a microwave are the instructions! However they don’t tell you at what wattage the microwave is! All foods packaged for microwave normally tell you what wattage it was cooked at so you can make adjustments to add or subtract time according to your home microwave.

    🍔 They didn’t even add a USDA WARNING that all pre-cooked foods should be rewarmed or cooked to 160 Fahrenheit for food safety and to make sure all bad bacteria has been killed. E Coli Hawaii here we come!

    Actually the sodium is not that bad if you watch your other meals of the day. Don’t forget that is only the sodium for the mystery meat and gravy (that gravy reminds me of my babysitting days before potty trainings) as you’ll still need to add the sodium for egg, rice and whatever else you might add.

    For daily sodium you ideally shoot for 2,300mg or 2,000mg per day total. If you have any health issues you’ll need to go lower and childern should be limited to 1,700mg per day total.

    That money shot you made really showed how much of a hockey puck that mystery meat patty is! Some grill marks or char on outside would have helped but when you bit into it the schlock would still be there.

    Have fun with you next one as the Demi Glace should be darker with more meaty flavor! LUCKY YOU POMAI!!

    Reply
    • May 6, 2018 at 8:00 pm
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      Ken,

      The label does say it passed USDA inspection. I take it boiling it for 3 minutes brings it well above 160 degrees F (212°F). It sure was scorching hot to touch! Most micowaves today are 900 watts plus. You’re more likely to get e.coli from Romaine lettuce.

      Look at all the precooked foods at the supermarket deli that don’t have all those warnings and reheating instructions on their labels.

      Then there’s recent news about the guy who ate 30,000 Big Macs, and has good health!

      https://www.google.com/amp/abc7chicago.com/amp/food/wisconsin-man-eats-30000th-big-mac-hamburger/3435351/

      Damned if you do, damned if you don’t. 😉🤔

      Reply
    • May 7, 2018 at 7:51 am
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      I think you nailed it Ken, reminds me of the “mystery meat” in MREs and C Rats… Actually got fed C-Rats from a case stamped with a 1969 manufacture date while in USAF Basic in 79!

      Best Regards!

      Haru

      Reply
      • May 7, 2018 at 1:42 pm
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        Haru,
        C Rats…USAF, you sure know how to tug at a guy’s heart! I was a radio operator on old WWII C-47 during my two years in Vietnam for USAF during 1967 to 1969 flying all over Southeast Asia. Loved the C Rats beans and franks, meat balls and spaghetti, fruitcake, fruit salad. We didn’t have the new MREs.

        When I wasn’t flying I was cooking steaks, burgers, French fries and hot dogs in our squadron grill. Other squadron grills were doing pizza, fried chicken and fish n’ chips not including canteens in the on base clubs so we never had to go to the mess hall.

        Best Regards,
        Ken

        Reply
        • May 7, 2018 at 7:05 pm
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          Ken,

          That’s an amazing coincidence – My MIA bracelet which I’ve worn for decades has the name of Alphons A Bankowski on it – From Stanford CT (close to my grandparent’s home in Norwalk) went down almost exactly 4 months to the day before I was born here at Queens. What did he do? Flight Engineer on Gooney Birds. Lost over Laos in an SC-47 Intel Bird. He was never recovered though some finally were…

          http://www.taskforceomegainc.org/b357.htm

          I’ve actually jumped C-47’s (Was a jump qualified ROMAD in the TACPs assigned to the Army – LOTS of radio work too, Hotel, Uniform, Victor, Fox Mike – all that ancient stuff for combat control) Grand Old Birds with many still flying. I did all the cooking for my units as well. Used to be the official Imu Guy for our pig roasts when stationed here. Learned it from my parent’s neighbor in Ahuimanu years ago.

          Pomai,

          sorry for the OT… Two old Airmen reliving the good old days… I actually went to the other side on a whim today to check out the old neighborhood. Wow! Has it changed. I stopped at Masa and Joyce’s to pick up lunch and ate it at Bellows Field during a break in the rain. Pretty standard Okazuya stuff – Saba,Tempura, Cone Sushi, etc combined with a mini bento from Foodland with rice, fried chicken and teri hotdog I had picked up earlier when I stopped to get a drink. They were on sale (fresh) for $3.99 so I couldn’t resist. Ono Teri Dog by the way.

          The food was pretty good and I had stopped early enough so there was a good selection. The only complaint I had was the veggie tempura wasn’t cooked all the way through and was mushy in the middle. It was huge though so I ate around the edges and it was all good. Gonna have to add 20 minutes to my walk tomorrow though to work off that heavy stuff!

          Will make it a point to try Tamura’s tomorrow -sounds delish. Back in the day as I recall, Aku was the go to poke, not ahi. A little slippery for some folk I suppose but I like it. The Purity Hot Sausage was the bomb this morning, fried it up with some teri Spam as well. Eggs, rice, toast, and takuwan alongside. Thanks for the tip.

          Best Regards to both of you!

          Haru

          Reply
          • May 8, 2018 at 1:17 pm
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            Haru,
            315th Air Division was assigned to my base and I would work on some of their aircraft. I loved my time in Vietnam and spent an awful lot of time TDY.

          • May 8, 2018 at 7:15 pm
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            Ken,

            makes the years fall away doesn’t it? The roar of recip piston engines still can’t be beat in IMO… By the way, my favorite C Rats were the tuna, ham, cheese spread and crackers and believe it or not, the green eggs and ham… :D

            Aim High!

            Pomai,

            I took your advice on the Aku Poke at Tamura’s but on a whim went to the West Side original in Waianae after first driving out to Kaena Point Park this morning. The park is still beautiful and even with the classic sun/rain at the same time plenty of folks were enjoying it. Lot of roadwork going on and it was slow going in spots. Sad to see the number of homeless camps that have been set up there – some look pretty permanent – one had it’s own porta-pot! Everytime I come home it seems the situation is worse…

            Back to a happier subject. I stopped at Tamura’s Super on the way back at about 10:45 and as usual it was crowded but I found parking no prob. Inside, the hot counter was mobbed but the poke counter only had a couple of folks there. They must of been experts because they were telling the lady behind it EXACTLY what they wanted for their order right down the pieces! :D

            It was fine though since it gave me time to scope out the offerings. They had a really good selection as well as the dried aku poke @ $28.95 a pound (it’s like good dry aged meat – you aren’t paying for the water) I got a quarter pound of that along with a half pound of marinated taegu and a half pound of smoked marlin – both of which were products of the USA and on special at $13.95 a pound.

            Went back out to the car and proceeded to pop the lid on the aku and gave it a try. Like you said Da BOMB! Chewy, salty, sweet, with a good deep flavor – almost like a local version of salmon candy from the Pacific Northwest where they cure and smoke salmon chunks in brown sugar . Super Ono. Reminded me also of my Japanese Grandma Michiko’s old fashioned katsuo bushi made from a solid rock hard dried chunk of Bonita that she shaved to make dashi stock and to add flavor to all kinds of dishes in her kitchen back in Japan in the 60’s. I used to steal some and get scolded but not too badly… :D

            The marlin and taegu had to wait till I got back and they along with the aku were paired with rice and some banchan / tsukemono from Don Q’s for a fantastic lunch. The taegu was perfectly sweet, chewy, and spicy while the marlin was smokey, fibrous, with a sweet undercurrent and a dry very meaty texture (I’ll chop it fine with some mayo to make spread with the rest).

            Overall a great day and I appreciate the tip!

            Best Regards to both of you!

            Haru

          • May 8, 2018 at 8:03 pm
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            Haru,
            I worked mainly KY8, KY28, O1E, O2A, OV10, C47, C119, C123, C130, A26 and I also worked with F100, F101, F4, F111, B57.

            I second Pomai on Chun Wah Kam, good stuff they are out in Kapolei.

          • May 9, 2018 at 7:43 pm
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            Ken,

            lots of classic warbirds there! Early on in my career I was assigned to TASS squadrons and we flew O2s and OV10’s. First two jumps I made at Ft Benning were out of a C-123. Also used to jump C-7 Caribous. If you ever have a chance to go, the Hurlburt Field AFB Fl home of the 1st SOW has an airpark filled with aircraft you’d remember. I’ve actually flown in or worked with some of these very aircraft over the years but now they’ve been put out to pasture like I have! :D

            http://www.hurlburt.af.mil/Portals/84/documents/Hurlburt%20Field%20Air%20Park/Airpark_Guide_2015.pdf

            Pomai,

            I’ll take yours and Ken’s recommendation up tomorrow and hit Chun Wa Kam for some noodles and manapua. I had to finish off the 1.5 pounds of fish I bought at Tamura’s yesterday… :D Spent the day purchasing and mailing a bunch of local ingredients that I can’t get (actually I can but at a prohibitive price) so I can make real local style at the house. I’m gonna hand carry my jars of Hawaiian Sun jelly so there won’t be another “accident” like last time as well as my Kona Coffee (they’ll probably think I’m trying to hide something with it). That stuff costs more than gold on the mainland!

            Best Regards to both of you!

            Haru

          • May 10, 2018 at 5:04 pm
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            Haru,
            Looking at Hurlburt Field shore brought memories back. Thanks for that!
            They even have one of our shadows and a memorial to my old base Phan Rang.
            A lot of our birds are in those photos.
            Mahalo!!

            Best Regards,
            Ken

        • May 10, 2018 at 8:07 pm
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          Ken,

          glad to bring back some memories for you! Brings back more than a few for me too. Mahalo Koa for your service over there during a very difficult conflict.

          Pomai,

          I hit the original Chun Wa Kam in Kalihi this morning. It hasn’t changed a bit with all the old guys spattered in flour taking a smoke break outside. :D I was lucky and scored a parking space right away – last one too. Just a short line inside and I got served quickly after only about 2 or 3 minute wait but it filled up quick.

          I’m glad I remembered that a mini here is more than regular sized plates at most places. I ordered the Chow Mein and the Saimin Noodles for the starch and went for the Honey? Chicken (didn’t ask – they still don’t have signs) for the rest, plus a baked Char Siu Manapua. They didn’t have any roast pork out yet ( it was 7:45 am). The entire plate cost $9.00, weighed about 2 pounds and bulged at the lid… :D

          Needed to fill up at Hickam so I drove out to the boat harbor there, grabbed a seat and had at it. The manapua was well baked and golden brown with plenty of char siu in a thickened gravy (hadn’t changed a bit). The noodles as usual were the best part of the plate – can’t beat fresh made – they have that good chew and bouncy texture – not too greasy but enough to be very satisfying. The chicken was good with sizable chunks well cooked in the sweet sauce but pretty standard – no complaints.

          I could have driven out to the fancy one in Kapolei but, like Tamura’s in Waianae, I try to go to the original ones while they’re still there. It’s harder and harder to find that kind of old school experience anymore and I seek it out when I can. Reminds me of a much simpler time here.

          Best Regards to both of you!

          Haru

          Reply
          • May 15, 2018 at 7:05 am
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            OK,
            finally somewhat recovered from a 36 hour day (Flights, Airports, Drive)… Great trip! Didn’t quite reach my 5 pound weight gain goal but did my best :D. Friday was pretty much my final day in town so I tried to make the most of it. 45 min walk through Waikiki, then fixed a great breakfast at the hotel – eggs, rice, Portagee sausage, takuwan, and ocha (really enjoyed having that kitchen!) then went and stocked up on more foodstuffs to bring back with me.

            For lunch, I’ve been saving my favorite fish store for last. Went to Take’s Fish Market at 99 Ranch for a sashimi lunch. IMHO they’ve got the best quality sashimi for the best price here in Honolulu. Impeccably fresh, handpicked selection, prepared with care by the Japanese owner and his wife. It’s not cheap but for what you would pay at D.Q you get a lot more bang for the buck and the fish is consistently much better quality. It’s a bargain really.

            I purchased 2 trays – $17 and $11 – the first was a nice mix of Ahi, Sake, Taco, and Hamachi with a morsel of Toro included as well. The second was a Ahi and Sake mix. Together it was close to a pound of very fresh fish skillfully cut and presented. Brought it back to the suite and set myself up with all the fixings and had at it. Fantastic! The sashimi was perfectly tender with no gristle. The Sake in particular was buttery rich, the Taco was tender not rubbery, and the Ahi and Hamachi were ocean fresh. Yes it cost about $30 but I challenge anyone to find that kind of quality and quantity anywhere for the price. The owners are very nice elderly Japanese who really know what they’re doing and treat you with the greatest courtesy.

            Pomai,

            If you haven’t done so (I didn’t see them listed in the posts) you really should go and review them. They sell almost any kind of seafood but the selection depends on what the owner deems good that day and they will prepared sashimi bowls of anything you buy to eat there for $1-2? more that the cost of the fish. Go early though. I was there at 10:30 am and they had sold a good deal of their trayed sashimi already.

            For dinner I went to Tony Roma’s right around the corner and got a half rack of St Louis Ribs with original sauce. Nuff Said! :D Overall a great trip and even though my suitcase with all of my carefully packed foodstuffs – Local Spam flavors, Dashi bases, Kona coffee, Teas, etc with 6 jars of Hawaiian Sun jellies – was opened and inspected as usual, this time no breakage, I included a note asking them to be careful since I needed all that to “make Local Kine Grindz in da middle of nowhere Bama” Guess they took pity on me! :D

            Already looking forward to next year!

            Best Regards

            Haru

  • May 6, 2018 at 8:57 pm
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    Pomai,

    The USDA inspection on the package means after butchering an animal (post-mortem) to assure that the animal is free from disease, and that the meat is wholesome and fit for human consumption. The inspection is a service paid for by tax dollars.

    It has nothing to do with cooking the patty or the gravy inside the package.

    The only way you know you’ve cooked foods to the required 160F degrees is with a thermometer.

    My microwave is 1,000 watts and most frozen food packages I see indicate the product was cooked with a 1,100 watt microwave which means I have to add time (actually I have a microwave conversion app that I use).

    Unless you worked in a commercial kitchen and understand proper handling of food products and cooking you can’t assume anything because you are playing Russian roulette with people’s life’s,
    .

    Reply
  • May 6, 2018 at 9:39 pm
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    Pomai,

    All the food in the supermarket deli are being held at service USDA temperature.

    Once you purchase it you are expected to eat it within 4 hours which is the danger time for food outside the safe food temperature zone or are expected to refrigerate or freeze it for storage.

    All food has a proper safe storage life in cold storage, refrigerator or freezer storage and you are expected to throw it out if you go over storage time.

    If you go to a buffet you will notice all the foods are held at service temperature but you will notice they will change out the food so as not to go over that 4 hr. USDA time.

    The biggest health department food inspection violation at restaurants is not keeping foods at proper temperature at prep station, pre service station or buffet line.

    Reply
    • May 6, 2018 at 9:52 pm
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      Ken, this is a really interesting conversation about food safety. Mahalo for all the knowledge you bring to the table!

      Interesting fact: my father was an assistant manager for the Hawaii state department of agriculture before moving on to manage Hawaii’s entire papaya farming industry. He used to tell my mom that many of the roadside food vendors selling along the highway where we lived were probably not complying with food safety regulations. This was way back in the early 70s. For the reasons you mentioned.

      Reply
  • May 6, 2018 at 9:54 pm
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    Pomai,
    Every food has an ideal service temperature and storage temperature.

    Maybe you should read the USDA food requirements or the State of Hawaii Department of Health Food Safety regulations.

    Get into one of your friend’s restaurants and talk to the head chef.

    Don’t forget, you are the head chef running this blog which people from around the world listen to what you say.

    Reply
      • May 7, 2018 at 12:46 pm
        Permalink

        Pomai,
        Everything on Redondo’s website addressing “food product safety in manufacturing” is correct and required however don’t keep mixing apples and potatoes. We are talking two different subjects as it relates to a food product.

        Food safety as it relates to manufacturing and food safety as it relates to serving the finished product and storage there-after.

        The raw meat must be kept at chilled temperature below 39 F degrees while being processed and inspected for any bad bacteria such as Salmonella or Listeria.

        Bad bacteria thrive at temperatures between 40 F degrees and 140 F degrees. This is called the USDA “danger zone”. So just cooked foods should be held for srevice at no less than 140 F degrees.

        Previously cooked foods should be reheated to 160 F to 165 F degrees to kill any bad bacteria that grew when the food was in the “danger zone “. Always make sure to reheat leftover food to safe internal temperature as verified with a thermometer.

        Any perishable food left out on table not held at temperature more than 2 hours should be thrown away or throw away after 1 hour if air temperature 80 F degrees. Any food held for service at temperatures more than 4 hours should be discarded and thrown away.

        Each food type held for storage in refrigerator or freezer has a minimum and maxium allowable time which my be hours, days, weeks, months or years. The same is held true for other food staples depending on non-refrigerated type of packaging and storing conditions. Remember heat is your enemy in food storage.

        USDA has temperature charts for safe food handling gor all food types.

        Reply
        • May 7, 2018 at 10:21 pm
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          Ken, point taken.

          Whole Foods Market Queen in Kaka’ako will open this Wednesday, May 9, 2018. It will be the 4th WFM and largest in the state, occupying 72,000 square feet of retail space on two floors.

          I was invited by the company to preview the massive store today. There will be many prepared food stations there where this subject of food safety applies. If there’s any grocery retailer all about that, it would be Whole Foods for sure.

          Reply
  • May 7, 2018 at 6:07 pm
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    Surely you didn’t try to eat that without some mac salad.

    Reply
    • May 7, 2018 at 6:26 pm
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      Doc, Mac salad wouldn’t have helped. I did think about it though!

      Reply

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