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Peanut Butter, Guava Jelly & Fried Egg Sandwich

In a thread I created over at the LOL Hawaii Facebook group titled “Funny Food Habits” (regurgitated from this blog), group member Kanani S. suggested trying one of her faves, a Peanut Butter Guava Jelly & Fried Egg Sandwich. WTH? Really!? She swore it’s really ono, so I just had to give it a shot.  

Here you see for the “ingrediments” I have Love’s Hearth 100% Whole Wheat Bread (my pantry standard), Skippy creamy Peanut Butter, Hawaiian Sun Guava Jelly and local farm-fresh eggs from OK Poultry out in Waimanalo. The BEST eggs on the island, period! 

Frying in the pan, you can see how large and gloriously orange-yellow that luscious local egg yolk is. A thing of tasty beauty! 

Kanani specified to cook the egg over-easy, which normally I’m down with for that runny-rich “yolk soak ‘n dip” action, however this is the only part where I decided to cook it over-well, being I didn’t think that runny yolk would play well particularly with the peanut butter. 

Assembling this crazy concoction of a sandwich, I generously coated each TOASTED slice of bread with peanut butter and jelly, finished with the fried egg in the center. Note I also gave the egg a hit of salt ‘n pep, as is always protocol for me with eggs. 

And? Um, no. This does not work. I understand this came under the subject “Funny Food Habits”, including folks who eat the weirdest of concoctions, myself included. I’m totally into this kinda’ stuff! But no, the combination of the peanut butter, very fruity sweet and slightly acidic guava jelly and fried egg? To me they butted heads as badly as republicans and democrats.

Even if I had kept the fried egg yolk runny, no. I can tell that still wouldn’t have made this any better. Perhaps worse. And I used the best, freshest eggs money can buy (they were just hatched a few days ago). My only other variable I can think of would be the choice of bread. Would white bread have been better, being more neutral in flavor vs. whole wheat? I doubt it. 

You know what I think would work in a Guava Jelly Peanut Butter Sandwich? BACON! Duh. Of course it would. Bacon is good with everything! 

Anyways, if you ask me? Kids, don’t try this at home. While clearly this proves the palate can be fickle, with this not working personally for me, still, I’d like to thank Kanani S. on FB for sharing her funny food habit. Mahalo! 

Related links:


Funny Food Habits (Tasty Island)

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8 thoughts on “Peanut Butter, Guava Jelly & Fried Egg Sandwich

  • March 11, 2018 at 4:59 pm
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    Pomai,
    I got hooked on grilled cheese with grilled tomato slices and bacon sandwich. Come to find out it is a menu item at a Cape Cod restaurant and thr Johnny Rockets in Kapolei Mall made me one because the chef loves to eat them.

    Reply
    • March 11, 2018 at 5:28 pm
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      Ken, do you ever eat grilled cheese sandwich with tomato soup? I tried that once and didn’t really care for the combo.

      Reply
      • March 11, 2018 at 6:33 pm
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        Pomai,
        All the time as I was brought up on that combo by my mother. BTW; the cheese, grilled tomato and bacon combo gives it a pizza like quality to the sandwich. Baked bean sandwich and chop suey sandwich plus snail salad along with America chop suey are New England staples.

        Reply
        • March 16, 2018 at 11:03 am
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          Ken,

          I had feeling you’d be familiar with Grilled Cheese Sammy and Tomato Soup combo. I think I didn’t care for it, because the tomato soup I tried it with was Campbell’s Tomato Soup…. not the greatest take on that soup, I’d imagine. Something like a Tomato Bisque would be better I imagine.

          OK, you lost me on Chop Suey Sandwich and Snail Salad. As in Escargot?

          Reply
          • March 16, 2018 at 1:38 pm
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            Pomai,
            Chop suey sandwich is a southern New England delicacy found mainly in Fall River, Ma where the Oriental Chow Main noodle factory is located and Rhode Island. It is a hamburger bun topped with either vegetable or ground meat chop suey covered with fried chow main noodles drenched in dark brown savory gravy top with hamburger bun top. If it is take out normally wrapped tight in wax paper so no leakage.

            Snail Salad is a only found in Rhode Island Italian thing as it’s true name is Scungilli salad. It is made using cooked and tenderized conch, or whelk sea snails thinly sliced mixed with thinly sliced celery, red onion, black olives red pepper flakes all marinated in red wine vinegar and extra virgin olive oil.

            There is a savory Korean version of this snail salad.

          • March 16, 2018 at 2:02 pm
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            Ken, I remember you telling me something about that Chop Suey sandwich before. Sure is a crazy concoction. Surprised nobody here does it.

            That Scungilli Salad sounds fantastic! I’d love to try it!

  • March 13, 2018 at 5:54 pm
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    A common passover breakfast (or dinner) is matzo brei, which is lightly soaked matzoah pieces mixed with beaten eggs and made like scrambled eggs. People either eat this savory with salt and pepper, onions, or sweet with powdered sugar, vanilla and/or maple syrup cooked in with the mixture. Full disclosure, I think the sweet version is gross and I can get through the savory version with copious amounts of mustard (I do not like scrambled eggs).

    But none of this is my point. Sweet matzoh brei is like sweet scrambled eggs. Most people love it. This makes me think you might consider trying a modified version of the sandwich by beating eggs, incorporating some of the guava jelly, scramble and put on the toasted bread as a sandwich (I honestly can’t imagine guava and pb together anyway, but I guess you can try a thin spread of that on the bread. Or maybe add a guava glaze while cooking over easy/over hard eggs. It might make for an interesting sandwich.

    Reply
    • March 16, 2018 at 11:00 am
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      h,
      One version of sweetened eggs I’m familiar with is a local style by simply adding soy sauce and sugar in beaten egg and making it into an omelet. It’s an acquired taste, and “interesting” I suppose. Clearly has Japanese influence.

      Reply

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