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Happy St. Patrick’s Day!

You may know Corned Beef isn’t originally an Irish dish, but was said to be introduced to the Irish American immigrants by their neighboring Jewish folks in the New England area as a replacement for “bacon”; essentially boiled ham. Yet it stuck, and today Corned Beef & Cabbage is now known the country over as associated with and a must-have “Irish Dish” on St. Patrick’s Day.

That said, I ran to the supermarket today to grab my Corned Beef ‘n Cabbage essential “ingrediments”: Corned Beef Brisket; specifically 4.36 lbs. worth of USDA choice point cut by Colorado Premium, a bag of russet potatoes, carrots, cabbage and a bottle of yellow mustard. Bam!

I haven’t started cooking it yet, which I’ll do later this afternoon in my trusty pressure cooker. Takes only about 45 minutes to around an hour in the pressure cooker (vs. approx. 2 hours conventional!), and so easy to do, being a one-pot meal. Of course, always put in the cabbage, carrots and potatoes towards about the last 5 minutes of pressure-cooking just to get them fork-tender al dente.

Just thought I’d share this to get you inspired in case you haven’t yet, to go get this stuff while it’s all on sale today, so you too can celebrate all things green today, the right way with your own Corned Beef & Cabbage feast tonight!

Oh, and in case you have time today, check out the St. Patrick’s Day Parade in Waikiki. Starts at 12 noon to 3pm, starting from Ft. DeRussy, down Kalakaua Avenue, ending at Kapiolani Park.

Happy St. Paddy’s Day!


9 thoughts on “Happy St. Patrick’s Day!

  • March 18, 2017 at 3:44 pm
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    Pomai,
     
    I desalt my corned beef in cold water for two hours with about three changes of water before I steam roast it on a rack (keeping above and out of beef stock) in pressure cooker on a Fagor Induction Pro Cooktop burner which has a built in timer that turns off cooktop at end of time. I also add vegetables in a steamer basket the last 6 min of cooking so they are done just right.

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    • March 18, 2017 at 4:59 pm
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      Ken,

      I’ve always cooked corned beef directly out of the package, never desalting it. Never was too salty to me, nor to people I’ve served it too. Turns out really tasty! Oh, but that’s right, I’m talking to the “Sodium Cop”. lol

      Oh, and I’ve always cooked it completely submerged in the water in the pressure cooker, not steam method like you do. When I serve my corned beef, I always add lots of that tasty corned beef and seasonings infused cooking liquid to my plate. I read one recipe online where the person goes as far as adding cornstarch to the cooking liquid after everything’s done and removed to thicken it into a gravy. I might try that some time.

      Reply
      • March 19, 2017 at 3:38 pm
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        Pomai,
         
         The tastiest way I’ve ever had corned beef, was one St. Patrick’s Day when my wife and I were up in VT skiing at our ski club lodge walk out front door to lift lines. One of the members made typical St. Patrick’s Day boiled dinner but instead of boiling the corned beef it was roasted in the oven and only the vegetables were boiled.
         
        My wife and I went crazy over it as it was just smooth and mellow in taste with a great corned beef flavor and very tender no knife required to cut it!. As a matter of fact all 50 of us at the lodge that weekend went crazy over the corned beef and demanded the recipe from the cook. Sunday morning we had great corned beef hash and eggs for breakfast!
         
         Unfortunately when my wife died, so did the keeper of the oven roasted corned beef recipe. This is why I steam roast my corned beef in the pressure cooker, higher temperature to melt fat cap, up out of the liquid not sitting in it as excess corning salt is leaching into the liquid.
         

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        • March 19, 2017 at 4:26 pm
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          Ken, I was in Costco earlier last week, where the “sample lady” was handing out Corned Beef samples, which was oven-roasted in a convection oven at her station. Don’t know how she kept up with it, but she did. It was definitely more intense and natural in flavor vs. boiled, and super tender. I liked that it had a toasty browned fatty crust on the large piece I sampled.

          Yet, the pressure-cooked boiled version works equally well for me. The one I have shown here turned out EXCELLENT, prepared exactly as I stated in the post, straight out the package. The cooking liquid wasn’t excessively salty at all, and believe me, I’m sensitive to salt! And I can’t reiterate how important it is that you eat Corned Beef with nothing but good ‘ole American Yellow Mustard. The best!

          Speaking of which, here’s the Corned Beef & Cabbage plate from Kelley O’Neil’s, which to note, their corned beef was roasted, not boiled…

          Reply
  • March 22, 2017 at 5:00 pm
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    I’m glad to see you used Colorado Premium brand corned beef. I tried the one from Costco once, and didn’t like the texture. The Colorado Premium tastes the best. I got a 3.5 lb corned beef and a head cabbage for free using Foodland’s Maikai reward coupon. Score!!

    I do mine in the oven. A butcher in San Francisco told me to place the corned beef on a large piece of foil, then place it in a deep baking pan or casserole. Cover the corned beef with water half way, then seal it up tightly. Bake at 350 for 2.5 – 3 hours. Comes out so tender every time. I throw in the potatoes and carrots about 30 minutes before it’s done, and the cabbage about 15 minutes before it’s done. So ono, but I have to admit I need both ketchup and mustard. Smile!

    Reply
    • March 22, 2017 at 10:18 pm
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      khs68 (Aunty!),

      I honestly never heard of the Colorado Premium brand before. I just grabbed whatever was on sale at Foodland up the street (Beretania location), being that was a pit stop from Don Quijote, who had sold out by St. Patrick’s Day. Fortunately as you’ve pointed out, the Colorado Premium Corned Beef turned out excellent! I seen that free cabbage deal on the sign at Foodland, but I didn’t have any rewards coupons on me, plus I already had a head of cabbage from DQ, which was on sale for something cheap like 19 cents/pound. Safeway has their own brand of Corned Beef on sale for $2.99/lbs. It looks pretty good based on what I can see through the vacuum package.

      I’ll have to try that oven-braised method you do, based on that SF butcher’s recipe. I like the idea of getting more of a roasted (crusted?) flavor than just boiled in its own liquid. The only thing I don’t like the sound of in the oven is the long cooking time of 2.5 to 3 hours, wheareas I can do mine in my pressure cooker for around just an hour. I should try Ken’s method where he steam “roasts” it in the pressure cooker; this buy keeping the meat above the water on a steamer rack in the pressure cooker. I LOVE my pressure cooker! By far one of the most useful “tools” in my kitchen!

      Reply
      • March 22, 2017 at 11:02 pm
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        Before the oven method I used to boil the corned beef on the stove. So humbug checking to make sure it simmers and not boils. If you want a crust don’t do the SF method, instead just oven roast which my friend tried and said was really good. He put on a mustard glaze the last hour of cooking. I have a fear of pressure cookers because when I was very young, the pressure cooker my aunt was using exploded and she got burned. I know pressure cookers have come a long way since then, but I still can’t get myself to try one.  BTW: According to my jewish friends in NY, the only cut of corned beef they will buy is the leaner flat cut, which is more expensive. The point cut has more fat, but it is juicy. I like fatty meat; the fat makes my fur shiny. LOL

        Reply
        • March 22, 2017 at 11:25 pm
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          khs68,

          That’s the beauty of the pressure cooker, is once it builds pressure, which is indicated by a button on the valve, you turn down the heat to low and it keeps the pressure at that low temperature. So not only do you save time, you also save energy! And today’s pressure cookers (mine is the highly respected Fagor brand from Spain) are practically explosion-proof, with a built-in pressure relief valve system and lid locking design that makes it pretty much impossible for the lid to blow off.

          Interesting about putting a mustard glaze on the oven-roasted corned beef. I LOVE mustard on my corned beef! Speaking of which, and Jewish, I once made homemade Kiawe-smoked pastrami out of this type of packaged corned beef. Turned out oishii! You can check that out here.

          I agree about the fattier (and cheaper!) point cut. I like the sound (excuse) of “making my fur shiny”. lol

          Reply
  • March 23, 2017 at 8:56 am
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    Pomai:

    We lived in NY for 14 years so now hubby complains about not being able to find pastrami as good as it was in NY. Duh, we back in Hawaii. I miss brisket on a roll with raw onions and mayo (gasp). I used to get funny looks when I ordered it at Carnegie’s (now closed) and Katz’s (still there I think). I saw your thread on pastrami and thought to try it after hubby said “not same” when I bought the “Carnegie Deli-Style” pastrami at Costco (not carried anymore). Sadly we only have a gas grill and will need to buy a weber (had one but got all rusty and spiders took up residence), or a green egg smoker ($$). Once we smoked a turkey in the weber, took long time and came out looking like a football but was so juicy.

    I forgot to add about the corned beef mustard glaze: you need to mix in some brown sugar so it will caramalize and look purty.

    Reply

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