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Punahou Carnival 2015

The annual Punahou Carnival took place this past Friday and Saturday, February 6 & 7, 2015 from 11am to 11pm. The title and theme this year was “Island Style: Carnival No Ka ‘Oi”.

Pretty much the same shindigs, including all the E.K. Fernandez rides and game tent kiddie games, “White Elephant” tent, including plant store, book & music store and Haku Lei sale. Not to mention all da’ grindz, including Punahou Carnival’s famous Malasadas and Portuguese Bean Soup.

It’s always exciting and PACKED with people. In fact, I had a hard time finding parking anywhere in nearby Makiki, ending up finding parking “in the monkey’s @ss”, halfway up Manoa Valley! Man are my feet still sore from walking back up that hill!

Punahou Carnival is notorious for being rained-out, however as my experience has been in recent memory, as was this past weekend, there were overcast clouds, however no precipitation at all.

Following are photos and a fun video I took at the event yesterday (Saturday) afternoon. Enjoy!

Deep-fried Oreo Cookies
Deep-fried Oreo Cookies
Pepperoni Pizza

Funnel Cake
Snicker Ice Cream Bar
Snicker Ice Cream Bar coated in chopped Almonds
Snickers Ice Cream Bar with Candy Sprinkles
Corn on the Cob

Shaka Shack Smoothies
Hawaiian (beef) Super Gyro
BBQ Teriyaki Chicken Sticks (soaked in Teri’ Sauce after they’re grilled)
May’s Teriyaki Hamburgers grillin’

Teriyaki Hamburger gettin’ the works
Teriyaki Hamburger
Punahou Carnival Saimin
North Shore Noodles
North Shore Noodles
North Shore Noodles
Maki Sushi, Inari (Aburage) Cone Sushi and Nori Musubi
Kaka’ako Taco Salad
Kaka’ako Taco Salad
Kaka’ako Taco Salad
Punahou Carnival Portuguese Bean Soup (from the 2009 post)
Punahou Carnival Malasada line
Punahou Carnival Malasadas
Punahou Malasadas production tent
Deep-fryin’ malasadas
Coating the pipin’ hot malasada in granulated sugar
Pomai’s Punahou Carnival Malasada, hot off the press!
Pomai’s pipin’ hot Punahou Carnival Malasada, gettin’ some!
Pomai’s pipin’ hot Punahou Carnival Malasada, gettin’ some!
Punahou Malasadas were 10 scrips ($5) per dozen (9 shown)
Paroah’s Fury and Ferris Wheel by E.K. Fernandez
Jungle Twist “roller coaster” ride
Jungle Twist “roller coaster” ride
Scooter Bumper Cars
Wave Swinger ride by E.K. Fernandez
The Zipper by E.K. Fernandez
Area 51 “anti-gravity” ride
Riders exit the Area 51 “anti-gravity” ride
Super Slide

“Mommy, what’s the big black disc with the puka in the middle for?” Mom replies, “Son, that’s an old iPod.” LOL!

“Look Son! Like that old iPod (the vinyl 33 LP record), here are old school Kindle Fires!” LOL!

Related links:
Punahou Carnival – Punahou School official site
PICS: 2015 Punahou Carnival – Honolulu Pulse (Star Advertiser)
Punahou Kicks off ‘Island Style’ Carnival – KHON2 News
Food is a big part of the Punahou Carnival – KITV4 News
Punahou Carnival features 250 local artists – Pacific Business News
2009 Punahou Carnival – The Tasty Island

16 thoughts on “Punahou Carnival 2015

  • February 8, 2015 at 8:59 pm
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    Eh Pomai, I thought malasadas didn’t have holes, etc.

    Reply
  • February 8, 2015 at 9:22 pm
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    keoni,

    Excellent observation. I’ll have to do some research on why that is.

    They’re doughnut-like, yet not really. Actually, what I love most about Punahou’s Malasadas, are the wild and unique shape each one has (vs. a boring round ball), which affords a totally fun and satisfying eating experience, picking off bits and pieces from the edges as you make your way through it.

    Ultimately, I seriously think Punahou Malasadas are THE BEST Hawaii has to offer, and I stand by that!

    Reply
  • February 8, 2015 at 10:34 pm
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    The only malasadas I’ve had were from Leonard’s and I’m NOT going start one argument over who’s are best!  :lol:

    Reply
  • February 9, 2015 at 1:19 am
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    My cousins saw this entry from San Francisco and wish they could fly down now to

    attended the carnival.   Their no other place around with such great food .  When mom

    was in Mckinley High she worked in carnival selling S&S saimins booth which was

    very popular that time. .

    Reply
  • February 9, 2015 at 1:06 pm
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    It is all about the mango chutney.

    Reply
  • February 9, 2015 at 3:18 pm
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    @ Pat – We always had jars of Mango Chutney in our home growing up, being both my grandmother and mom made it, mostly for eating with stews. Never cared for the stuff myself, even to this day. The Mango Chutney ingredients on that Punahou T-shirt sounds pretty much how they made theirs. Speaking of which, notice the quantities on the Portuguese Bean Soup T-shirt recipe… totally WHACK!

    @ Amy – I actually missed some of the “essential” carnival grindz, such as the Mango Chutney, Hawaiian Chili Pepper Jelly, Huli Huli Chicken and Hawaiian food booths, as I had some stuff to do. Also missed the art exhibit, which I’m sure was really neat. It can take you just about a whole day to really experience EVERYTHING the Punahou Carnival has to offer! Not to fret, as I provided some links with more coverage from other media sources.

    @ Keoni – Next time you’re in Kailua, check out Agnes Portuguese Bake Shop. Their Malasadas are very similar to Punahou Carnival.

    Reply
    • February 10, 2015 at 4:41 am
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      Dang! Another stop when I visit my sister in Kailua! Funny how she’s never mentioned these malasadas to me…. saving ’em for herself… but she just sent me a care package with Maebo one ton chips and arare, so she gets a pass this time…

      Reply
  • February 9, 2015 at 6:40 pm
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    Mahalo Pomai, I’ll check ‘um out.

    Reply
  • February 9, 2015 at 7:24 pm
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    Portuguese Malasadas on the East Coast in New England are large and puffy like flying saucers,

     

    Reply
  • February 9, 2015 at 9:55 pm
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    Pomai, you are The Best! Thank you for posting this. I attended P.S. growing up and carnival was always the highlight of the year. The rides, games and FOOD. Ridiculous. Some of the food booths, classic:  Malasadas, saimin, teri burgers/sticks, bean soup, corn on the cob.  Also popular were the tacos (pre-taco salad), chili dogs, Hawaiian plate, chutney!  Glad to see they kept those.  The other items are new(er) additions: candied apples, ice cream bars, taco salad, noodles, sushi, gyros, smoothies, deep fried oreos (OMG) and funnel cakes.  They also tried having a “healthy” booth like veggie sandwiches on W/W bread with sprouts, way back when.  The 2015 prices are still actually very reasonable. The Hawaiian plate only $8.50!  That’s really reasonable for a carnival. Thank you again for all you do!

    Reply
  • February 10, 2015 at 4:05 pm
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    @keoni
     
    Your observations about Portuguese malasadas having holes like donuts and no holes like fritters got me thinking because like I indicated Portuguese malasadas  on East Coast in New Bedford, MA are like large puffy flying saucers sold at the 100 year old largest Portuguese Feast Festival in the world; “Feast of the Blessed Sacrament”.
     
    After a quick google search I learned malasadas are “Portuguese donuts”, a ball of fried yeast dough without a hole in the middle like regular donuts. After frying, they are rolled in confectioners sugar. The terms “Filhóses” and “Malasadas” are sometimes used interchangeably, and sometimes one refers to doughnuts while the other refers to fritters without a hole in the center. The size and shape of the malasadas are unique to the particular region and recipe of the individual cook making them.
     
    Different regions have different definitions of Filhós and Malasadas.  Filhós are made by stretching out the dough with your hands into flat shapes and frying them whereas in preparing the Malasadas you drop the dough into the cooking oil by large tablespoons.
     
    When the Portuguese first colonized Madeira and later the Azores Islands in the mid 1400′s they brought the deep frying method along with them. The Malasada is credited to have been originated on the Island of Sao Miquel. The other islands as well as the main land of Portugal call the fried confection “Filhós”.
    When the first Portuguese immigrants moved from the Island of São Miguel to Hawaii, to work on the sugar cane plantations in the late 1800′s they brought the malasadas recipe with them. Today, Malasadas have been incorporated into the cuisine and extremely popular in many parts of Hawaii. Although traditionally not made with any fillings, in Hawaii they can be found in many flavors, and filled with creams and puddings so filled malasadas is unique only to Hawaii.

    Reply
      • February 11, 2015 at 9:51 am
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        @KeithF, I live in Hawaii Lol!

        Reply
        • February 12, 2015 at 2:49 am
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          Wow, sorry… thought you were in Mass… mo’ betta you not shovelling snow!

          Reply
          • February 12, 2015 at 10:33 am
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            I used to live in Rhode Island but got tired of paying high taxes and shoveling snow so I moved to Honolulu.

             

          • February 13, 2015 at 5:31 am
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            Ken: So just the high taxes, eh? LOL As they say, Lucky you live Hawaii!

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