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Harry Lyons’ Bill of Fare: Beethoven’s Fifth


Harry Lyons’ Bill of Fare: Beethoven’s Fifth

This is the second part of an ongoing series covering Harry Lyons’ Bill of Fare, an out-of-print book guide to Hawaii’s finest restaurants, featuring dining tips, cartoons and recipes. Harry Lyons was the editorial cartoonist for the Honolulu Advertiser throughout the 60’s and 70’s.

Note that, being this book was published in 1972, many of the eateries featured in it are no longer in business, including Beethoven’s Fifth, which was formerly in the downtown Honolulu area.
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Review by Harry Lyons

BEETHOVEN’S FIFTH
92 North King Street
Honolulu, Hawaii
Tel. 521-2111*

“In the center of the City of Honolulu we would like to give you a quiet and good meal with what we call “Gemutlichkeit.” We do  not want to be a quick service center. However, we aim to serve you good, fast and most of all individually.”

With these words on his bill of fare, owner Pete Birnbaum  spells out the philosophy of his warm, cheerful, very German restaurant smack in the heart of downtown Honolulu.

They so serve you a “quiet and good” meal, but BEETHOVEN’S FIFTH is anything but somber. The tavern-like atmosphere is alive with the sounds of piped-in German music and occasionally punctuated with the happy chirps of heavy wood cuckoo clocks from the Black Forest announcing the happy hour. Another sound you can count on is a happy hum of conversation.

People are relaxed and satisfied here. The food is hearty but never heavy. The tablecloths are red-checked, the dark beams rich and rugged. A bust of Beethoven surveys the scene from its perch in the center of the room. Big oil paintings and a tapestry of a stag at bay share space on the walls with huge wooden hogshead casks.

Over the busy bar hang big porcelain beer mugs, Lowenbrau steins and old hunting horns. This is the only German restaurant in town at this writing, and Herr Birnbaum has spared no effort to give it the atmosphere and warmth of a hospitable Bavarian inn.

Settle down at a cozy table or a soft black leather booth. At night, thumb through the little heavy leather-bound menu. The parchment pages are divided into both English and German descriptions of their offerings.

BEETHOVEN’S FIFTH is open for both luncheon and dinner. At noon, business is brush with downtown Honolulu’s business trade. I love the soup here, made with lentil with sweet-sour taste, and ham and pruned added. Wunderbar! Entrees include bratwurst, knackwurst, German pot roast of beef, Bavarian liver sauté, eggs Benedict, a Rueben sandwich or cold sausage salad.

Spaetzle mit Speck und Eier (Noodles with Bacon and Eggs). Photo courtesy of ColumbusFoodie.com.

Sauerkraut, potatoes, apple rings, onions, spatzle, salads and cheeses are artfully combined with the above to offer a vast and varied luncheon menu.

Dinner welcomes you with the lentil soup, Hungarian Goulash soup, liver dumpling soup, or a tasty appetizer of a filled patty shell with ragout fin and asparagus. There are specials offered Monday through Saturday (closed Sunday) and they include treats like Veal Cutlet ala Holstein with fried egg, anchovies and capers on Monday, veal and pork meatballs in supreme sauce with capers, white wine and fine herbs on Wednesday, and Veal Cordon Bleu stuffed with ham and Emmentaler cheese on Friday. Stop by yourself to check on the other entries. They’re excellent.

Veal cutlet, marinated roast beef, liver and onions, knackwurst, smoked pork loin, veal steak and cold sausage platter are here every night.

The rich German desserts are great. A fine selection of imported and domestic beers and wines flow. A LYONS TIP: ask for a “bear-hunter” after your meal. It’s a honey-flavored liqueur with a silky-smooth swallow and a kick like you’ve met up with a Black Forest bruin.

PRICE RANGES:
Luncheon: $1.65-$2.45
Dinner: $2.65-$6.10
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HOT GERMAN POTATO SALAD

2 lbs. potatoes
3 oz. bacon
2 oz. oil
3 oz. vinegar
1-1/2 oz. small diced onion
5 oz. water
1-1/2 oz. chicken base
7 drops egg color
2 tsp. German mustard
1/2 tsp white pepper
1/2 tsp. salt
1/2 tsp. finely chopped parsley

Slice potatoes thin and boil. Add salt, pepper, parsley, onion and oil. Put water, egg drops, vinegar, German mustard, and chicken base in pot. Bring to boil. Pour over potato salad. Dice bacon and fry very crisp. Pour bacon (including grease) over entire dish. Serves six.

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~ Harry Lyons

*This establishment is NO LONGER IN BUSINESS.

Pomai’s Notes

While we’re now on the subject of a German restaurant, “Kona” Wally, the Tasty Island reader who reintroduced me to Harry Lyons’ work, spent many years living in Germany while in the armed forces, becoming fluent in the German language. And every time he returned home to the islands, he’d seek out German restaurants to get his fix on the likes of of authentic Schnitzel, various wurst and bier.

Along with Beethoven’s Fifth, other German eateries in Honolulu “Kona” Wally has visited in the past (and are no longer around) included:

Hoffbrauhaus – International Market Place, Waikiki
Pepi’s Hofbrau – Lewers St., Waikiki
Bavarian Beer Garden – Royal Hawaiian Shopping Center
Alpine Haus – Lewers St., Waikiki
Kaiser Wilhelm’s – “some strip mall”

All those places have been added to the Oahu Eateries Memorialized list.

Unfortunately if you look up German restaurants on Oahu on Yelp, there currently are none, except for the Wurst-Wagen, which is a lunch truck. Being part German myself (my grandfather on my mother’s side was half German, half Hawaiian), I also would love to reconnect with my German roots through the cuisine. If you’re aware of a restaurant on Oahu (or on any Hawaiian island) that serves German dishes, please let us know!

On his most recent trip to Honolulu last weekend, Wally tried to hook-up with the Wurst-Wagen lunch truck, however that didn’t pan out due to the storm, and also their location.

In the next installment, Harry Lyons reviews the Blue Dolphin Room…

25 thoughts on “Harry Lyons’ Bill of Fare: Beethoven’s Fifth

  • August 16, 2014 at 6:32 pm
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    Whuh. German potato salad, warm. Mom served it with ribs or bratwurst back in my homeland in Wisconsin. There is nothing better. She used to add green olives and radishes.

    Reply
    • August 16, 2014 at 6:47 pm
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      Marcus,

      Warm German Potato Salad, with Green Olives and Radish mixed in it? That sounds TOTALLY AWESOME!

      Reply
      • August 18, 2014 at 2:36 pm
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        It is, brah, take my word. I love this Harry Lyons series! Keep ’em coming.

        Reply
        • August 18, 2014 at 5:14 pm
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          Marcus, glad to hear a good response on this series. I was concerned some readers might be put off because it’s not me writing the review, as i got flack for having guest bloggers in the past.

          I think Harry’s reviews are an important historical resource and time machine of Hawaii’s food & beverage and hospitality scene during the “colorful” 60’s and 70’s era. For instance for chefs thinking up recipes and are looking for what Hawaii’s culinary scene looked like during that era for ideas. Many dishes were trends of those times that are no longer around, and sometimes new chefs like to do retro stuff as featured in this book. When was the last time you seen a Chi Chi as the featured drink on a bar menu?

          This particular entry might encourage local chefs to do some fusion dish with German influence, such as, say “Parker Ranch Spatzle”, or a “Pipikaulawurst”. You see where I’m going here. ;-)

          Reply
  • August 16, 2014 at 8:52 pm
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    Pomai,

    Reminds me when I was helping the Army Corps of Engineers in Germany with a problem and ended up on temporary loan for a year to U.S. Defense Information Systems Agency (DISA) in Washington, DC at a historical military army station that looked like a country horse farm in VA which was finally closing under Base Realignment And Closure (BRAC) that had very close ties to Germany during WWII. During Oktoberfest the German Army filled a C-130 full of food and beer flying it to the U.S. and setting up three tent halls full of beer with German beer hall maidens in dress, proper German food and the military Oktoberfest band. You’d swear you were in Germany! It was hell for anyone on base to work that week with a 24/7 party going on all for free from the complements of German Army and Government to anyone on base as a show of appreciation for all the U.S.A. did during WWII!

    When I feel like eating German in Hawaii I go to Foodland, Kapolei to R. Fields and purchase their Boar’s Head German style products (knackwurst, bratwurst, liverwurst and sauerkraut) but for best authentic German produce shipped to Hawaii you have to order in (5 lb. min.) from Usinger’s Sausage, 1030 N. Old World Third Street, Milwaukee, WI 53203 also on the web. I’ve been purchasing from both for over 30 years plus visited both companies.

    Reply
    • August 16, 2014 at 11:47 pm
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      Ken-San said, “During Oktoberfest the German Army filled a C-130 full of food and beer flying it to the U.S. and setting up three tent halls full of beer with German beer hall maidens in dress, proper German food and the military Oktoberfest band”…

      now THAT’s what I’m talkin’ ’bout! Nice!

      I should have known Boar’s Head would have all those styles of German wurst. Speaking of which, I have a couple packages of Mountain Apple Brand Portuguese Sausage from KTA Superstore on the Big Island of Hawaii that I’m going to review next. Stay tuned!

      Reply
    • August 17, 2014 at 1:23 pm
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      Bockwurst and red cabbage. The latter also carried by Foodland.

      Reply
  • August 17, 2014 at 1:21 pm
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    Used to be a good German restaurant in Kamuela. Edelweiss. Closed now. But was around for 20 years or so. Mashed parsnips and carrots. Spatzle. Roast half duck with a dark fruit glaze and gravy. Killah.
    By the way, if you have not tried parsnips, buy a couple really good ones, skin, and use in place of a couple carrots. Say in a stew or cacciatore . You will be surprised how good they. Taste like a cross between carrots and salad potatoe. Old ones are stringy tho.

    Reply
  • August 17, 2014 at 3:18 pm
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    Pomai,

    I checked and 14 of my cookbooks have German specific recipes (over 40 recipes) in them from soup, salad, main course, side dish, bread to dessert and cookies plus over 20 recipes to make German sausage.

    Reply
  • August 17, 2014 at 3:38 pm
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    @ pat – I’m sure “Kona” Wally has been to Edelweiss. I’ll most definitely take you up on substituting carrots for parsnips. They sell them at KCC Farmers Market. I like the sound of it being a cross between a carrot and potato. Probably good to use in that German Hot Potato Salad recipe.

    Next time I go to the store, I’ll look out for Bockwurst, and get some red cabbage to go along with it. How do you prepare it?

    @ Ken – I think I’ll start with making Beethoven’s Fifth Hot German Potato Salad included with this review. Sounds delish! I know you said parts of the east coast have lots of Portuguese. What parts are known for lots of German immigrants?

    Reply
    • August 17, 2014 at 4:26 pm
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      There are two kinds of red cabbage already prepared in the canned vegetable section. One made in New York that is ready when warmed up. Foodland carries one made in Germany. That one you must add a bit of water and warm over stove. Some people add a chopped up half cook bacon strip and let the flavor simmer in. The store bought is just as good as slaving over a raw red cabbage.
      BTW, we often cook with both carrots and parsnips, just using less carrots then normal.

      Reply
    • August 18, 2014 at 5:38 pm
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      Parsnips are especially good roasted. I like to roast them with onions (and sometimes carrots), a little oil and seasoning, till they are dark and crispy.

      Reply
  • August 17, 2014 at 7:13 pm
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    Pomai,

    In New England there are a lot of German-Americans in southern, western and northern Massachusetts and southern New Hampshire. This is also where you’ll find the bulk of German restaurants. I used to eat at one in Plainville, MA and the other located in West Springfield, MA which was just over the RI border. The famous von Trapp family (Sound of Music) settled in Stowe, VT because it looked like their homeland Austria.

    I make a German Hot Potato Salad almost like the recipe but a little different. I fry the bacon whole first and then reserve. I boil the potatoes whole first then slice them. I sauté the onions in the bacon fat and then create the sauce with flour as a light roux before I add chicken stock and vinegar but I don’t use egg color in the fry pan; add sliced potatoes to sauce and crumble on the cooked bacon. Add some grilled Kielbasa, Bratwurst, Knackwurst, Frankfurt, Wieners, Bockwurst, Stuttgarter Knackwurst, Weisswurst, Kishka, Thueringer Blood Sausage or Pork chop and Sauerkraut or red cabbage plus pickled red beets and wine you got a meal!

    Reply
  • August 18, 2014 at 6:01 am
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    I like my warm potato salad with a little zing. Anchovy puree, heavier on the mustard, capers and caper juice

    Reply
  • August 18, 2014 at 8:58 am
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    @ Arny, dang that’s quite some extra “zing”! I don’t know why, but capers don’t float my boat, and I usually love anything pickled.

    @ Ken – Ah, Massachusetts and S. New Hampshire are “Germanville”. Got it. Regarding Von Trap, my grandfather was a Von Arnswaldt, who’s lineage goes back to Stuttgart, Germany (home town of Porsche).

    Regarding all those Wurst sausages you serve with the Hot German Potato Salad, have you ever tried boiling them in Bier? In fact, even basic hot dogs boiled in beer are great. It adds a nice “hoppy”/”earthy” flavor to it.

    @ Pat – looks like Foodland it will be for that canned red cabbage from Germany. I’ll most definitely add some bacon in it to jazz it up.

    It’s great to see this post spark interest in German cuisine! Who needs a restaurant? We can make our own!

    Reply
  • August 18, 2014 at 12:43 pm
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    Pomai,

    I cook my Wurst the way I was taught in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, poach the Wurst in a sauce made of Bier and onions. If grilling, then once poached place on grill using tongs (never use fork) to brown. If casing skin looks like it is going to pop then place back in poaching sauce to plump and cool; continue to grill in this fashion till Wurst is fully grill browned on all sides and skin is unbroken and Wurst is plump and juicy.

    Did you know the best place to see, experience and sample the best Wurst is in Munich at Alois Dallmayr’s store in Dienerstrasse between Maximilianstrasse and Marienplatz. The shop history goes back over 300 years. This magnificent emporium has between 120 and 130 varieties of sausage. Germans like to say they produce 1,458 different sausages but I think this does not refer to types but covers personal variations introduced by individual German manufactures. My book on the world-wide history of sausage covers 600 varieties across all the countries of the world.

    Reply
    • August 18, 2014 at 12:56 pm
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      Ken,

      I’lll try adding onions to the bier next time I boil sausages (very rarely do I eat sausage in general because of the obvious high sodium and fat).

      Does that book explain the origins of Chinese Lup Cheong sausage? Have you ever eaten Lup Cheong? It’s best simply steamed and eaten with rice, with a little soy sauce and cilantro. Lup Cheong is also excellent as a “stuffing” for fish.

      Also, have you tried Japanese Arabiki Sausage? The locally made Redondo’s brand is nice ‘n snappy.

      My aunt in Alaska used to make a kick @ss Smoked Halibut Sausage and Smoked Marlin Sausage. OMG, those were the best sausages ever!

      Reply
  • August 18, 2014 at 7:17 pm
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    Pomai,

    You don’t boil sausages—–you poach which is different and softer way to cook the sausages. When you poach the sausage first you melt the fat and release the seasonings the fat was holding into the meat also leaching out the extra curing salt into the water. Then when you fry, grill, broil, bake or steam the sausage you are working with just pure meat and a better tasting less salty sausage. My Italian friends taught me this when teaching me how to make and cook Italian sweet and hot sausages and I was surprised when I was taught the same technique in Milwaukee, WI cooking Brats and other German sausages.

    “The Great Book of Sausage” by Antony & Araminta Hippisley Coxe; Published by The Overlook Press 1996; ISBN 0-87951-682-8 has a recipe from Ken Hom for Lap Cheong rice and goes into great detail across two pages about how it is manufactured in Hong Kong by the Tse Hing Chuen Company which sells under brand name King of King. All sausage are made by hand because no machine has been made that does not squeeze the moisture out of the meat. This also includes stuffing the meat into the casings by hand. Highest quality and leanest of meats are used to make the sausages. Ap (duck) Yeung (liver) Cheung (sometimes spelled cheong or chang is sausage) (China/Hong Kong). Doong Gwoo Lap Cheong Jing Ju Yook (Chinese/Hong Kong) is a complicated sausage made of pork, chicken and mushrooms, Lap Cheong (China/Hong Kong) is a pork dried sausage made from pork, soy sauce, paprika, sodium nitrate, grain and alcohol, Lo Chou Cheung (China/Hong Kong) is lean and fat pork but extra sugar added, concentrated soy sauce and wine filled into dry hog casings, Mui Kwai Cheung (China/Hong Kong) Mui kwai means “Rose” which takes name from rose wine added to lean and fat pork, soy, salt and sugar, Sin Ap Yeung Cheung (China/Hong Kong) Sin means “fresh” so in this sausage the duck (ap) liver (Yeung) is not preserved. Fat pork, salt, soy sugar and Chinese wine are other ingredients; Wong Sheung Wong Fong Cheung (Hong Kong) Wong Sheung Wong means “King of Kings” and is the specialty sausage of the well-known company in Hong Kong of that name. It is made of fresh lean and fat pork, seasoned with soy and salt, sugar and Chinese wine.

    Lup Cheong sausage seems to be the Singapore spelling of Chinese Lap Cheong. I keep Kam Yen Jan brand Chinese style dried sausage in my house all the time as a go to staple.

    In my book “Making Great Sausage” by Christ Kobler; Published by Lark Book; 1946; ISBN 1-57990-131-X he has the complete recipe for Asian Lop Cheong sausage which is another spelling for Chinese Lap Cheong with ingredients of pork, pork fat, sugar, soy sauce, sweet rice wine, sake, 5-spice powder and hog casing dried cured in your oven.

    I tried a package of Redondo’s brand Japanese Arabiki Sausage once and I wasn’t impressed! Maybe it was the way I cooked it or expecting it to taste like the frankfurters I was accustomed to back in New England (Boar’s Head, Usinger’s Sausage and Saugy) pork and beef or all beef.

    I know I have the recipe for Lobster sausage but in two of my CIA recipe books and Maine recipe books there are recipes for seafood sausage made with fish. I spent three weeks traveling through Alaska.

    Reply
    • August 18, 2014 at 8:03 pm
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      Ken,

      Dang, next time time I do a blog post on anything with Lup Cheong in it, I’m copy>pasting that paragraph all about the stuff you just posted! What an earful, yet very interesting! My favorite is the Kam Yen Jan brand you mentioned, only because I grew up with that brand, which as you know was originally from Vancouver, Canada (now in Washington state). Especially convenient that the unopened package is shelf-stable without need for refrigeration.

      Thanks also for the details on properly POACHING (not boiling!) wurst and other sausages. So you’re saying it’s a 2-step cooking process, where you first poach it to remove excess fat and salt, then grill or fry it. My mom’s a local gal, so she taught me to rapidly boil (not poach) hot dogs in beer.When I tell friends about that method, they cringe, yet when they try it, they’re usually very impressed with the flavor.

      I tried the Lobster Dog at Hank’s Haute Dogs, which has a combination of chunky lobster tail meat, shrimp and surimi (fish paste). It’s poached in water, then finished in a pan with clarified butter. Have you tried Hank’s Haute Dogs yet? I’m curious what you think of their Chicago Dog.

      Reply
      • August 19, 2014 at 7:42 pm
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        Pomai,

        I vacationed in Vancouver, CA. Beautiful city, very clean and full of young population with a great food scene and night life. Yes the proper way to cook sausage is 2-steps (poaching and then final browning cooking).

        Even though Frankfurters are properly considered a sausage the way I was taught is to place them in water or beer and bring to a boil, lower heat to a simmer and tightly cover pot for 15 min. Then if you wanted to grill them, head to the grill or eat them right out of the pot as is. The whole idea is not to cause the casing to split. Of course if you are in New Jersey you want to fry them in deep hot oil till they split open, charred and are disfigured. They are call “rippers” or “cremators” depending on doneness and you top with mustard-relish (and special spices) sauce! Saugy Frankfurters German style (pork and beef) 135 years old are only made in Rhode Island and have a great snap to them; the closest to them is New York Boars Head pork and beef franks. The best in America is the Usinger Sausage ¼ pound 100% Angus Beef Frankfurt which was served at the Salt Lake City 2002 Winter Olympics and completely sold out. When I order from Usinger I always order a pound or two of the franks.

        I’m a regular at Hank’s Haute Dogs and have gone through the whole menu line up. I love his Chicago Dog which tastes exactly like the Chicago Dogs I ate in windy city Chicago which I had to visit every 6 months for work; another favorite is the Fat Boy. Of all his hot dogs I order about 90% of the time is the Chicago dog or the fat boy hot dog. I tried Hank’s lobster dog and almost could not finish it because it was way too fishy tasting for me. No sweet lobster taste! I’m from New England and if you have a lobster dish on the menu I better be tasting the sweet lobster meat!

        I follow James Beard award winning Chef Jasper White’s recipe for lobster sausage which uses the all the meat (including leg meat) from whole lobsters totaling 1 lb. diced and uses 8oz. of fresh shrimp or fresh scallops or frozen shrimp shelled and deveined pureed in food processor as the binder for the lobster force meat. His most interesting trick in the recipe is soaking the 5-ft of pork casing in pineapple juice for 18-24 hours to tenderize the casing which also gives it a unique flavor to the sausage. I use my KitchenAid stand mixer with the sausage maker stuffing tube attachment to make my sausages. You also poach the lobster sausage in water before frying or grilling them.

        Reply
  • August 19, 2014 at 2:56 am
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    Probably the closest you’ll get to German fair in Honolulu right now is the upcoming annual Oktoberfest at Hale Koa Hotel in Waikiki, Sep 24-27, 2014. If you’re interested in seeing what it’s like, there’s a YouTube video of 2009 KGMB news report http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YHIv015mAYY

    Reply
  • August 19, 2014 at 4:24 am
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    Feeling a little nostalgic here but the last time I drove by the Crouching Lion Inn I thought to myself “what a great place for a bierhaus’. I understand that under current ownership it caters mostly to the tour buses clientele during the day and acts a watering hole for the locals the rest of the time.

    Such a shame. Such good bones.

    Reply
  • August 20, 2014 at 10:03 am
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    Pomai:
    Cool discussion of German restaurants in Hawaii… I think my closest recollection of one was the Swiss Inn in Niu Valley back in the 80s. I knew the chef/owner, Martin Wyss and his wife Jeanie. Like a lot of the folks responding, I spent a few years in Germany while in the Army and love the food! Now here in Huntsville, AL, I have found no less than four German Restaurants. Some may think it odd that there would be that many in one town in Alabama… But when you learn that Huntsville is the home of the NASA center that developed the missiles for the space race after WWII and that’s where the German scientists like Von Braun were relocated to, and add that to the big Army base here (Redstone Arsenal) where there are a lot of soldiers and military retirees who spent tours in Deutschland, there’s quite a robust clientele for that cuisine. Now if there were only a schnell imbiss (German fast food) stand or truck in Honolulu…You might enjoy the pleasures of a schnitzel, bratwrurst, rindswurst, or Nurenburgerwurst mit brot und pommes frites, or a nice shaschlik…. mmmmmmm

    Reply
  • September 21, 2014 at 11:50 pm
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    Had to reply to the posts by Ken, Pat & Pomai………first…. Ken, you must have had “the need to know”………..I bet you were referring to Vint Hills Farm Station, outside of DC……….in ’63, I attended a Top Secret, experimental school there……..back then, they called it “The Show Place of the ASA” (Army Security Agency)………….Pat, I choose NOT to stop by my bank (for a loan) in order to purchase the sauerkraut & red cabbage at Foodland……….OUTRAGEOUS! Buy the bamucha sized cans from Costco & follow simple cookbook directions for sauerkraut. Similar for red cabbage……start with fresh heads & spice it up on the stove……both keep (or freeze) well for later…..when the brats go on sale!……….AND, you save a ton of Euros! LOL!……..Pomai……yes, I pigged out at Edelweiss MANY TIMES during their 20+ year run. I had actually met the owner, Hans Peter Hager, in Nuernberg, in 1969, (he knew my Pops @ Mauna Kea beach Hotel) when he returned to Deutschland for his 1st vacation. We kept in touch over the years & then reconnected when he returned to Hawaii to open the Kapalua Resort Hotel & then the Mauna Lani Bay Hotel as Executive Chef…….. before opening his Kamuela Gasthaus in ’83(?).
    TO ALL: the only place in the State (besides the Oahu Wurst Wagen) to satisfy your German (continental) food cravings is at Brigit & Bernard’s Garden Café in Kahului………..she’s Deutsch……..he’s Swiss………….and everything on the Speissekarte WILL BROKE DA MOUT!!
    Jetzt habe ich Hunger!!
    tschuess & Mahlzeit,
    Wally

    Reply
  • July 28, 2016 at 3:47 pm
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    Hi there, do you have the book “The Great Book of Sausage” with you? I’m interested in reading the pages mentioning King of Kings Lap Cheong but can’t find this book in my territory. Is there any way I can have a glimpse of it? Many thanks! ^^

    Reply

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