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Korean Tube Ice Cream?


Korean Ice Cream Tube – photo courtesy of Semi-Adventures.com

I’ve attended several Korean Festivals in the past when they were held at Kapiolani Park in Waikiki, however decided to pass on this year’s first appearance at Magic Island @ Ala Moana Beach Park, which took place this past Saturday, July 12, 2014.

Much to my surprise, today I learned that this year for the first time, the Honolulu Korean Festival offered these unique new Korean ice cream tubes, similar in size and shape of a candy cane, or an extended plumbing P-Trap, being that drain pipe under your kitchen and bathroom sink.

Neat-O!


Image courtesy of thepomnechy.wordpress.com

This candy cane/P-Trap shaped ice cream shell is said to taste kinda’ like Kellogg’s Corn Pops, with the same semi-spongy, semi-crunchy crunch. On the other hand, the site where I got the image above from described the tube shell as being made from animal fat mixed with sugar that “doesn’t taste natural”.

The ice cream it’s filled with is said to be your typical vanilla soft serve. It’s also said to be originally from the city of Insa-dong in Jongno-gu district of South Korea.

All I know at this point is, this is one of the most bizarre ways I’ve ever seen ice cream served, and I so wanna’ try it!


Korean Tube Ice Cream – photo courtesy of nicolesushi.blogspot.com

I abandoned my vegan diet to find out what this thing was. Well, it was flavoured animal fat mixed with sugar in a yellow tube that did not taste natural.

I abandoned my vegan diet to find out what this thing was. Well, it was flavoured animal fat mixed with sugar in a yellow tube that did not taste natural.

While a bit risque (viewer discretion advised), these two fun folks on YouTube are right there in Korea showcasing how this new ice cream sensation is served and how it tastes…

Did you attend the 2014 Korean Festival at Magic Island and try the “Tube Ice Cream”? If so, what did you think? How much did it cost (scrips)? Also, where can I get it at a store or kiosk here on Oahu, if at all?

Here’s a couple sites with photos of this past Saturday’s 2014 Korean Festival at Magic Island @ Ala Moana Beach Park

13th Annual Korean Festival featuring M.Pire – ExplorationHawaii.com
Pics: 2014 Korean Festival – HonoluluPulse.com

The Tasty Island related links:

Korean Festival 2012
6th Annual Korean Festival

9 thoughts on “Korean Tube Ice Cream?

  • July 14, 2014 at 11:37 pm
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    First time seeing it. I thought it was a Korean churro. In China and Taiwan they sell churro serve with ice cream in a cup with chocolate sauce. Where can I get this Korean ice cream cone in Hawaii?

    Reply
  • July 15, 2014 at 2:19 am
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    From what I have been hearing, it cost around 6 dollars at the Snow Factory stand, perhaps they were going to sell it as a regular product at the location in McCully Shopping Center?

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  • July 15, 2014 at 5:48 am
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    @ Rick – Mahalo for the tip on Snow Factory in McCully Shopping Center. I checked the Yelp photos of all 3 locations on Oahu, however not one person posted a photo of the Tube Ice Cream (which guaranz someone would have if they seen it!). I’ll give them a call later and ask about it.

    @ Amy – Amy, now THAT is a great idea! A long @ss churro “tube” filled with soft serve ice cream!

    @ Minh – I have that video embedded in the article. Fun stuff for sure! One thing I notice in the video shoot is how long the soft serve ice cream swirl holds its shape atop the tube “cone” in the chilly South Korean weather. If you were to shoot that same video at the Korean Festival at Magic Island this past Saturday during these hot Hawaiian summer days, I guarantee the ice cream wouldn’t last more than 30 seconds before melting enough and falling to the ground.

    Imagine all the potential ice cream flavor options with this “Tube Ice Cream” concept, not to mention “stuff” to either drizzle over or line the inside wall of the tube-shaped cone with… oh like say chocolate, caramel or coconut syrup, etc… you know. Cha-ching! $$$$$$$

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  • July 15, 2014 at 6:55 am
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    Amy’s idea sounds a bit more appetizing than animal fat and un-natural sugar. But the bend obviously is necessary.

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    • July 15, 2014 at 7:22 am
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      pat,

      Indeed, the bend is necessary to keep the melting ice cream from dripping out the other end. While the suggestive J-bend may be smart marketing, I personally would have made it a U-bend so two people (a couple) can share it equally. Awe, how cute! lol

      I’m mostly excited to hear it tastes like Kellogg’s Corn Pops. Sounds like a tasty combo’!

      Reply
  • July 15, 2014 at 9:14 am
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    Pomai, you might have come up with an design for a new ice cream cone. How about using a waffle dog shape and keep center hollow for to fill ice cream with?

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  • July 15, 2014 at 3:37 pm
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    This is so wrong at so many levels. Imagine if they put ice cream in one end and kimchee in the other! ATM!

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  • July 15, 2014 at 4:49 pm
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    SOLVED

    I just spoke with a very nice gal at Snow Factory in McCully Shopping Center, and she confirmed they were the vendor selling the Korean Tube Ice Cream at the Korean Festival this past Saturday. She said they make their own tube cones out of grits, also saying it indeed tastes like corn pops cereal, finally noting it’s a fantastic combo’ with the soft serve vanilla ice cream.

    All Snow Factory locations will begin selling the Korean Tube Ice Cream about a week or so from now (they’re still getting their supplies together). They haven’t settled on a price yet, estimating it to be around $4 to $6 each.

    http://www.yelp.com/biz/snow-factory-honolulu

    http://www.yelp.com/biz/snow-factory-waipahu

    http://www.yelp.com/biz/snow-factory-mililani

    The Korean name for it is Jipangyi Ice Cream, and it’s said to have started in the South Korean city of Insa-dong. The soft serve ice cream pumped in it is very new, however Jipangyi is said to be a traditional Korean street food that’s eaten by itself (no ice cream in it) as a snack.

    Reply

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