web analytics

L & L’s New Hawaiian Hamburger

Just when we thought we’ve seen it all with the Tanaka Saimin Burger, L & L Hawaiian Barbecue (a.k.a. L & L Drive-In) sticks it right to our gut with, yes, their all new Hawaiian Hamburger, which essentially is a Katsu Burger. As if deep-fried cheese wasn’t crazy enough, that can’t top a panko-crusted deep-fried patty of ground meat! Beef to be exact. For your convenience, dial 1-800-HEARTSURGEON should the need arise. lol

Which I have sort of a beef with, no pun intended, as there’s hardly anything “Hawaiian” about it, except for perhaps the fact that Katsu is a popular dish in Hawaii, irregardless of that being Japanese in origin. Yet I see they’re trying to use a catchy name that gives it a local, as well as company identity (L&L Hawaiian Barbecue). Personally I’d have named it the Sumo Burger, or something like that, which local folks can still relate to, and is more aptly fitting to what it is.

So Diner E walks into the office yesterday with this here “Hawaiian” Katsu Burger from the Iwilei L & L (by Costco), and I was like “Are you serious?” Yes, he was serious. Here it is zoomed out, shown accompanied with fries…

I swear, that is SO Hawaii plate lunch classic fries, being your typical frozen crinkle cut style. Yet you know what? They were DELICIOUS! Deep-fried to a nice and crispy exterior, yet soft and pillowy, steamy hot interior, and salted perfectly. Cheap frozen commercial fries don’t get better than that! Hey, at least I”m being honest here.

Back to the Katsu Burger, you know what’s next. Oh yes, THE MONEY SHOT…

You’re not a true “foodie” unless you hug and squeeze your food tightly, until it drips….

I’m so not supposed to eat this, however Diner E offered me a portion to try, which of course, being a Fa-reeking KATSU BURGER, I absolutely, without hesitation COULD NOT REFUSE.

And? DUDE! AWESOME! Seriously, this is probably up there in the top 5 styles of burgers I’ve ever tried. Swiss ‘n Shroom is of course my top favorite. Nothing can beat that. Any burger loaded with cheese also gets high votes for me. And of course any burger made with premium beef such as Kobe or locally-raised free range like Kulana is always amazing. The Tanaka Saimin Burger up there for whackiness. Now L & L’s Katsu Burger? Way, WAY up there for even more decadent whackiness! It’s simply insanely delicious in every sense of the word!

To my surprise, the panko crust TOTALLY matched the beef. Totally! Think Chicken-fried Steak, taken to another level. And OMG, the beef is SO, SO JUICY and beefy-tasty! Then you get that slightly soggy factor on the bottom side form the cripsy panko being melted by the thick slab of ketchup and mayonnaise sauce, which is SO ONO, you don’t even know. On top of that, you get the total contrast factor from the crispy fresh “greenness” of the iceberg lettuce, completed by a super fresh, substantially-sized white bread sesame-topped bun. The only thing missing in comparison to how it’s depicted on the poster with this copy, is it was missing the tomato, which would have made it even better!

But dude, I am telling you, if you’re a burger fan and seeking out the next biggest and baddest @ss thing, you MUST try L & L’s Katsu Burger, a.k.a. “Hawaiian Hamburger”. Provided they cook yours properly, as they ACED IT on this one, it will ROCK YOUR BURGER WORLD!

What will we see next? Perhaps a Saimin Katsu Burger? And when the hell is Chun Wah Kam going to bust out a Baked Manapua Burger? They’ve got all kinds of fillings, from Shoyu Chicken, to Pizza and even Hershey’s Kisses, but no Burger Manapua! Common’ people, NO BRAINER! But I wouldn’t make it with the ground beef steamed in the bun, but just use the bun as a bun, grilling the beef instead. Or even better yet, make it using a charsiu-flavored ground pork patty. Whooh!

In the mean time, you definitely gotta’ try L & L’s new “Hawaiian” Katsu Burger. 5 SPAM Musubi!

While we’re at L & L, also landing on the table were these Garlic Shoyu Chicken Wings…

I must say, L&L’s Mac Salad (which I sampled some) is done PERFECTLY, being super creamy, fresh tasting (no sourness), and best of all, kept SIMPLE, having just small shreds of carrots and a dusting of black pepper and that’s it…

Finally, under doctor’s orders, L & L’s Salmon Burger Salad with Brown Rice…

P.S. In case you missed all the fun (and drama), check out the recent post on the Tanaka Saimin Burger!…

Also, since we’re on the subject, don’t miss the epic Great Tonkatsu Sauce Shootout

35 thoughts on “L & L’s New Hawaiian Hamburger

  • October 5, 2013 at 8:32 am
    Permalink

    The contextual ads Google serves are so funny. Every time the posts here include the key word “burger”, an ad pops up about losing belly fat. It could be a tofu burger, and that ad would probably still show up. Heh.

    Reply
  • October 5, 2013 at 11:17 am
    Permalink

    Rainbow Drive-In sells a Boneless Chicken Plate. Well, you can order a Boneless Chicken Sandwich, with gravy. Oooooh – so yummy! I don’t know if it’s on the menu. Quite a few years ago, one of the old-timers (counter lady) told me about it, so I ordered it. Da bomb! Recently, my husband was there and ordered it …… the younger gal wasn’t sure and had to ask if they sold it. (He got it. And told me about it. LOL)

    Reply
  • October 5, 2013 at 11:29 am
    Permalink

    I live L&L Katsu Burger for it just the right amount to eat. Sometime too much is hard to eat it. One woman got her jaw dislocated trying to a pile hight hamburger. That could happen to me also but find getting messy more from pile burgers.

    Reply
  • October 5, 2013 at 11:30 am
    Permalink

    P.S I sometime forget to put my eye glasses.

    Reply
  • October 5, 2013 at 1:29 pm
    Permalink

    @ Amy – your quirky writing style is part of what I love about reading your comments. Always fun! You could probably post under a different screen name, and I’d still know it’s you. ;-)

    @ Sunny – As I tried to reinforce in the Tanaka Saimin Burger post, I don’t consider a burger a “burger” unless the meat (or fish or vegan sub’) is ground, not a whole fillet. Putting chicken katsu in a hamburger bun is technicalliy a chicken katsu sandwich, not chicken katsu burger. This here is truly a Katsu burger, through and through!

    What I’d like to do is completely replicate the traditional tonkatsu dish by making a Tonkatsu burger using ground pork, while for the “bun” make it out of rice, just like MOS Burger did with their Okinawa Burger. Coat the ground pork patty in flour, egg wash and panko, deep fry until GBD, place in rice “bun” topped with Tonkatsu sauce and finely shredded cabbage. Serve the Tonkatsu Burger with a side of Miso Soup and Tsukemono. Yeah, baby!

    Reply
  • October 5, 2013 at 2:01 pm
    Permalink

    Pomai,

    This katsu burger sounds interesting! I notice L&L formally announced it on Oct. 3, 2013 on their web site. I’ve got to stop by my local Waianae L&L and try one as this gets me thinking of other possibilities.

    I already figured out how to make a ¼ lb. cheddar stuffed bacon wrapped hamburger hot dog dressed with lettuce, tomato and mayo in a butter toasted Portuguese sweet bread hot dog roll by King’s Bakery.

    I regularly grind my own hamburger mixed 50/50 with apple wood smoked bacon plus ¼ lb. Portuguese sausage to make my hamburger patties but breading and frying the patty katsu style would add a whole new dimension!

    Reply
  • October 5, 2013 at 2:16 pm
    Permalink

    Ken-san,

    Mahalo for sending me the poster. I added it to the post, along with some additional notes regarding them naming it the “Hawaiian Hamburger”.

    I think the Katsu Burger is going to be very subjective as to who’s cooking it. If they over or undercook it, it will be a total deal breaker. The folks who cooked Diner E’s one did it PERFECTLY. It was fully cooked inside and so, so juicy, while the panko crust was perfectly done “GBD” (golden brown and delicious)!

    As for your cheddar stuffed bacon wrapped hamburger hot dog, GOODNESS! Seriously man, pure insanity! I had to pop some meds’ just reading that sentence, let alone eating that! I’m sure it’s insanely delicious, though.

    As Debbie-Chan and I agreed upon, when I do the Oki Burger, I’ll roughly chop up the Rafute (Okinawan Shoyu Pork), and mix it into the ground pork for the ultimate Shoyu Pork Burger Patty. Yeah, baby!

    Let me know if you end up “Katsu-fying” your burger and sausage patty. Snap a pic and send it over and I’ll share it here!

    Reply
    • October 6, 2013 at 7:04 am
      Permalink

      Look like a Hamburger Jun to me with panko.

      Reply
      • October 6, 2013 at 1:24 pm
        Permalink

        Kelike,

        Korean Jun-batter is rice flour and egg-based, not bread crumbs.

        Reply
  • October 5, 2013 at 5:54 pm
    Permalink

    Courtesy of Ken-san, check THIS out!…

    Mt. Fuji Burger

    Katsu Burger’s Mt. Fuji Mega Burger, Deconstructed

    Chef Hajime Sato
    Published Jan 26, 2012, 12:00pm
    By Allecia Vermillion

    mt-fuji-burger-diagram

    1. Ham, Pepper Jack Cheese
    “It was really hard to find all-natural ham.”

    2. Tonkatsu Sauce
    Made in house. “I cannot tell you everything that’s in it, but it’s like barbecue sauce meets ketchup.”

    3. Bacon, American Cheese

    4. Shredded Cabbage
    A traditional accompaniment to tonkatsu in Japan, it also adds more crunch than lettuce.

    5. Beef
    A panko-fried patty of grass-fed beef goes on top of the other meats because it’s smaller. “People ask if we can just do a plain burger patty, but then we end up becoming a regular burger shack.”
    Image: Olivia Brent

    6. Cheddar Cheese

    7. Wasabi Mayonnaise and Spicy Mayonnaise
    Both are blended in Katsu Burger’s kitchen, using Japanese Shirakiku mayonnaise and recipes adapted from chef Sato’s sushi restaurant Mashiko. “Why two mayos? Because it’s a ridiculous burger.”

    8. Tomatoes, Onions, and Pickles
    These are traditional burger toppings. “In America it’s all about the burger. But still I’m translating something from Japan to here.”

    9. Chicken and Pork
    Naturally raised chicken breasts and pork cutlets are pounded flat. Each piece of meat is dipped in tempura batter, dredged in Japanese panko bread crumbs, then fried.

    Reply
    • October 5, 2013 at 10:43 pm
      Permalink

      Pomai, as much I love to eat it afraid of getting Lock Jaw from it. Too high it scarcy. Plus it end up all over my clothing.

      Reply
    • October 7, 2013 at 6:23 am
      Permalink

      Now, if they could try replacing one of the mayo layers with some mac salad….. oh wow….

      Reply
  • October 6, 2013 at 6:54 am
    Permalink

    I hope Lihue gets it. I am not an L&L fan, but would like to try this to back a saimin.

    Reply
  • October 6, 2013 at 7:58 am
    Permalink

    @ Amy – if you’re referring to the Mt. Fuji Burger, I agree. I personally don’t like ANY food that’s over portioned. And that’s just ridiculous (no offense to Ken-san). Seriously, how do you even eat that? You’ll definitely need a knife and fork, and then with that, it’s not even a burger anymore. Totally defeats the purpose. Doesn’t the American general public get the idea that less is more? Quality vs. Quantity? Seriously, it really upsets me whenever I see fast food chains promote yet another “super-sized combo” meal. ACK!!!!!!!

    @ Pat – it really depends which L & L location. We had an L & L in Kaneohe back in the 80’s in front of where Mui Kwai Chop Suey is, and that location ROCKED. THAT was plate heaven.

    Ever since L & L became a franchise, some of the newer locations seemed to become generic and lacking character in the food, mainly because they’re using a flat top griddle vs. an open-flame gas grill. How can you call yourself “Hawaiian Barbecue” using a flat top to cook your meats? Utter sacrilege!

    Reply
  • October 6, 2013 at 11:45 am
    Permalink

    I wonder if the mainland L&Ls are serving this. I would try it, and probably ask for Tonkatsu sauce instead of the Thousand island style sauce. That Mt. Fuji burger looks insane for sure, yikes.

    Reply
  • October 6, 2013 at 11:57 am
    Permalink

    Pomai,
    My sister went to Katsu Burger and loved it. She said the Nori fries were good too.

    Reply
  • October 6, 2013 at 3:34 pm
    Permalink

    Of course not on Kauai. But they don’t even have beef stew. Nor a sense of presentation or what a local plate lunch is supposed to taste like. The entire restaurant is run by native Chinese who do not quite get it. I wish it would get a grad from Kauai Community College Culinary School in the kitchen.

    Reply
  • October 7, 2013 at 6:20 am
    Permalink

    In Germany, the roadside/kiosk/drive-in “Schnell Imbiss” (Fast Food; literally “Fast Snack”) stands have been selling schnitzel sandwiches foer decades. You know the schnitzel is a flattened pork cutlet that is breaded and fried like country fried steak / tonkatsu/ pork cutlet, etc.; the bread is a brotchen, a baked roll crusty on the outside and chewy on the inside that if not eaten that day, turnes to a rock by the next morning! LOL This is usually dressed only with senf(German Mustard like Chinese Mustard) sometimes you can get slivered onions on request. So this katsu burger is another evolution of a great idea!

    Reply
    • October 7, 2013 at 2:03 pm
      Permalink

      Keith-San, IIRC, you said you were stationed in Germany while in the service, correct? Which explains your adeptness for German cuisine. Not much German cuisine here, except for peace-meal dishes at various restaurants (usually if the Chef is German, of course), and a food truck called Wurst-Wagen.
      http://www.wurst-wagen.com/

      Interesting how this brochen bread turns rock-hard the next day. Ever try that infamous military grade biscuit cracker called Hardtack? Hawaii’s own Saloon Pilot Cracker from Diamond Bakery is said to have been based off the Hardtack recipe.

      That German version of Chinese style mustard called senf also sounds interesting. Wouldn’t have thought that flavor profile would match a deep-fried meat patty.

      In other related news, h suggested a Mac ‘n Cheese based burger “bun”. Well, consider it done!…

      Mac 'n Cheese Burger
      Rockit Burger Bar in Chicago features a Mac ‘n Cheese Burger, with a bun made of deep-fried mac-and-cheese, surrounding a beef patty, scallions, lettuce, tomato, and sriracha ketchup.

      Not quite decadent enough? Feast your quivering heart upon a burger with a bun made of grilled cheese sandwiches…

      Grilled Cheese Sandwich Burger
      Square Bar & Grill in Chicago features Grilled Cheese Sandwich Burger, made with a 10-ounce chargrilled beef burger topped with sautéed mushrooms, smoked applewood bacon, and swiss cheese. Oh, and yes, it’s stuffed between two grilled cheese sandwiches.

      While you still have a pulse, why have your fries as a side order, when that can be the bun!…

      Waffle Fry Sliders
      Philly’s PYT features Waffle-fry Sliders with three baby beef patties topped with cheddar and PYT’s secret sauce on waffle fry buns

      I’m putting my money down on the “Hawaiian” Katsu Burger for the taste contest win. I don’t know though, I have a weakness for swiss ‘n shrooms, and then topping that with a grilled cheese sandwich as the “bun”? Dang! Burger madness I so want some of!

      Reply
      • October 8, 2013 at 10:56 am
        Permalink

        Pomai:

        The German brotchen are made without preservatives and are usually intended to be bought and consumed on the same day. The Germans have this thing about hitting the markets every day; probably because German refrigerators are miniscule by US standards. My experience with baguettes in France is the same; buy and eat that day. The concept also goes to restaurants where you never see anyone taking home a doggy bag or leftovers. By the way, these schnitzel sandwiches are awesome; imagine a 3/8″ thick pork cutlet about 6-7 inches long by 3-4 inches wide between a crusty, chewy roll about 1/2 that size? Porky goodness hanging over on all sides! Sooooo ono!

        http://www.gdt-schoenecken.de/imbiss/HTML-Fotos/schn+b.htm

        Yeah, hardtack went out of the Army menu sometime around the Spanish-American War (1899); maybe it lasted a few years past that. The closest the Army got to hardtack since then were the crackers that were canned and shipped out in various evolutions of field rations: WW III C-Rations and Vietnam Era Meal Combat Individual (MCI). Those MCI crackers are very much like the saloon pilots, I also remember that the Civil Defense stored emergency food for disasters that contained these high calorie crackers called “civil defense survival biscuits”

        http://conelrad.blogspot.com/2010/08/life-cycle-of-civil-defense-suvival.html

        Since I can’t post pics here, here is another burger done all over the mainland you probably know about:
        Krispy Creme Donut Burger: http://laughlines.blogs.nytimes.com/2008/06/09/the-krispy-kreme-burger/?_r=0

        Also check out the different dishes on (no offense) This is Why You’re Fat website: http://thisiswhyyourefat.com/

        Wow… they know me so well….

        Reply
        • October 8, 2013 at 3:20 pm
          Permalink

          KeithF,

          In the mainland Midwest you will find schnitzel in most all restaurants, especially the State of Indiana which is known for its breaded fried pork tenderloin sandwich. You don’t have to fly to Germany: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5BFpcaUIbbo

          Reply
        • October 9, 2013 at 6:17 am
          Permalink

          Keith-San,

          Why is the brotchen roll so disproportionately small compared to the pork cutlet within it? Like I don’t get the ‘Dodger Dog’, where the weiner sticks several inches out each end of the bun. Same for burgers, where the bun is disproportionately smaller than the patty. Anything for me that involves some kind of bread encased meats and/or veggies has to have BALANCE, where I get a little of everything in each bite. That’s why I totally dislike oversized burgers.

          Interesting note about not taking home doggie bags. The U.S. is the only country where restaurants practice that on a regular basis, correct?

          You mention the “civil defense survival biscuits” being high calorie, which is also a key feature in current MREs, purposely to keep soldiers energized for an entire day. I still want to do a blog post on a few MREs… only I’m definitely going to have to run and swim it off afterwards!

          Yeah, the Krispy Kreme Burger came out some time ago. I think the Grilled Cheese Sandwich Burger has that beat in total fat and calories.

          Oh man, that “fat” website had me queasy just looking at the photos. Never heard of a “Baco” before! A taco with a shell made out of bacon? Lord have mercy!

          Speaking of which, a local radio DJ (Hazmat on KPOI) yesterday afternoon was talking about bacon and how studies keep going Yo-Yo on its health benefits (or detriments). One study says it’s bad for us, the next it’s good for us. The next it’s bad for us. So now we’re back on where bacon is GOOD for us, being it’s rich in Niacin, which is said to have “life-extending properties”, and “Niacin tricks the body into believing that it is exercising – even when this is not the case.” So you can theoretically be a couch potato gnawing on fried bacon sticks all day, and still live a full life.

          Read more here:
          http://www.geekosystem.com/bacon-niacin/

          Reply
  • October 7, 2013 at 6:27 pm
    Permalink

    Pomai,

    Waianae L&L special of the day was the Katsu burger (Hawaiian Burger) so I got my first one $5.95. It came with lettuce, tomato, onion and special sauce.

    The beef was tasty, very juicy and matched great with katsu crunchy coating. I think the thickness of the patty is just right for the coating to cook “GBD” without burning sealing in the hamburger juices.

    Even though both the white onion and tomato were thin sliced I think they overpowered the burger a little but it was a ONO burger!

    Next time I order I’m going to ask them to hold the onion and tomato. I’ll order take out and go home, cut burger in half leaving one side as is and replace the lettuce and special sauce with shredded cabbage and Bull-dog Tonkatsu sauce on the other side. A little taste test to see which is better.

    Reply
  • October 8, 2013 at 3:05 am
    Permalink

    Well Pomai. my cousins in San Francisco decided to make own katsu burgers with the lettuces and tomatos and onions to eat at home. There an L&L in the sunset dist. but rather try it out at home. They made it with katsu sauce and ketup and mustard also for some who like it. Cost of course under 6.00 for 4 people.

    Reply
    • October 8, 2013 at 6:28 am
      Permalink

      Amy, we need pictures. :)

      Reply
      • October 9, 2013 at 10:27 pm
        Permalink

        Well my cousins live in San Francisco and emailed me of it . They made it to eat more than taking pictures. They not into foodie pictures taking but eating more.
        Pomai take great pictures and got best camera for it . Cousins got cell phs.

        Reply
  • October 8, 2013 at 9:25 am
    Permalink

    Eh Pomai,
    If I wanted to order the katsu burger steak plate (like a hamburger steak plate) would make one for me @ L&L?

    Reply
    • October 8, 2013 at 2:01 pm
      Permalink

      Kevin,

      Waianae L&L was offering a katsu burger plate as well as just the burger alone.

      Reply
  • October 8, 2013 at 11:15 am
    Permalink

    Guess I need to pop into the one here in San Diego to see if they have this 5 Spam musubi rated burger. The bad thing is that the L & L here is never as good as the ones in Hawaii.

    Reply
  • October 9, 2013 at 5:22 am
    Permalink

    @ Ken-San – Glad to hear you had the same reaction as I did. As you noted about the burger’s thickness and the panko reaching “GBD”, it’s a fine balance. They could easily under or overcook this one.

    Regarding your experiment, some say Tonkatsu sauce is a good “steak sauce”, but I beg to differ, not finding it matches beef (as in a steak) as much as it does pork, mainly because its fruity background notes. I mean, it works, however I think perhaps a ground pork patty “katsu-fied” would taste better wtih cabbage and Tonkatsu sauce. But hey, give it a whirl with the L & L Katsu Burger and let us know how it tastes!

    @ Amy & Carol (and anyone with more questions about this burger) – L & L has an active Facebook page where you can ask which locations have or are planning on serving the “Hawaiian” Katsu Burger. Their FB administrator is very responsive to inquiries.

    @ pat – that’s what I always ask of Ken-san with his wild home experiments. He already sent me some outrageous photos of MASSIVE (IIRC) Maine Lobsters they devoured. Ken-San?

    Reply
  • October 10, 2013 at 4:11 am
    Permalink

    Pomai:
    The brotchen is a standard size, like a hamburger bun, and so, for most of these vendors, is the size of their schnitzel, which is for their schnitzel plate lunch (mit pommes frites und sosse – french fries and gravy) and a brotchen. Sadly they haven’t clued in to the awesomeness of adding some mac salad to it. Forget about two scoops of rice! LOL I don’t think I ever saw a doggie-bag in a restaurant my eight years in Germany; do they do that in Japan? It may just be another American phenomenon… huge meal portions to bring in the customers…bigger is better, no? And just another reason as why we. as a nation, are fat! There’s a show on the Discovery Channel called the United States of Bacon. It’s amazing to see the myriad ways the product is used. I’ll paraphrase Homer Simpson and just say .. mmmmmmm bacon! (drool)

    Reply
    • October 10, 2013 at 5:08 am
      Permalink

      Keith-San,

      Nope, no doggie bags in Japan, other than the the westernized restaurants within the hotels. Nothing’s more magical than PERFECT PORTIONS. I LOVE when I walk out of a restaurant saying, that was perfect. Hit the spot!” Not, “Oh man, I’m stuffed. Someone get me a wheelchair.”

      It doesn’t surprise me an entire tv series on BACON is a hit in the US, as is Man vs. Food. Sigh.

      I shop at Don Quijote’s Kaheka location frequently, where many nihongin (Japanese nationals) also shop. And if you take notice to what they place on the checkout counter, it’s usually mostly various vegetables and seafood, and rarely any meat (beef/pork/chicken) or frozen processed foods. And if you look at them, they’re all very slim.

      Reply
  • October 10, 2013 at 4:27 am
    Permalink

    Pomai:

    Just thought to add here on the Hawaiian Burger, at least, they didn’t do what almost every restaurant on the mainland would do…put in a pineapple slice! I’ve always wondered why ham and pineapple on a burger or pizza made it “Hawaiian”. Ironic that the pineapple isn’t an indigenous Hawaiian plant but from South America… and I don’t think Hawaiians cured and smoked their pork… so I also agree with you in how is katsu Hawaiian? It would have made more sense to make a kalua pig patty instead! (hmmm wonder how that would be done? might have to do some experimenting)

    Reply
    • October 10, 2013 at 5:28 am
      Permalink

      Keith-San,

      Oh man, don’t get me started on the “Hawaiianized” EVERYTHING, just because it has pineapple and ham in or on it. Your points exactly!

      As stated, I really think this Katsu Burger would be more aptly named the “Sumo Burger”. Or if they had a larger Katsu Burger, (double-decker), name that the “L & L Sumo Burger”, and this single patty version the “L & L Samurai Burger”.

      You’re right! A true “Hawaiian Burger” would be more aptly made using Kalua Pig. I’d say Chop Kalua Pig and mix that in ground pork and grill it, then place it on a “bun” made out of chicken long rice, with steamed laulau luau leaves as the “greens, lomi salmon as the “topping” and poi as the “special sauce”. Side order of “Hawaiian Fries” made from Hawaiian wetland taro root. Whoah!

      Reply
  • October 10, 2013 at 11:06 am
    Permalink

    Kimukatsu’s Shirokiya location has a similar item on their menu now. I think they just call it the Kimukatsu burger, but it is like menchi katsu in a bun.

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *