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Most Ridiculously Expensive Restaurant Menu Items: The Hawaii Project

TheWeek.com recently published an article* titled “5 ridiculously expensive restaurant menu items“, showcasing the following:

POCKETS ARE DEEP IN THE CULINARY WORLD

1. The Cary Arms’ $61 baked potato

In 2010, this British hotel served a very decadent potato, called the “tuxedo spud” because it looks like it’s dressed up to go to a fancy ball. It’s also a reference to the nickname Brits have for the baked potato: the jacket potato. The tuxedo spud is prepared like a normal baked potato, then loaded with chives, spring onions, and creme fraiche. Then it gets expensive when the chef tops it off with a generous portion of $60-per-pound caviar. It also comes with vine ripened tomatoes, a salad, and a glass of champagne.

2. Nino’s $1,000 pizza
This pricey main course — offered by a New York City eatery in 2007 — was just a 12-inch pizza. Why so exorbitantly priced? Because it was topped with six varieties of caviar and fresh lobster. Customers even had to order their pie 24 hours ahead of time so the restaurant could get the caviar.

3. 666 Burger’s $666 burger
Last year, New York City’s devilish 666 Burger food truck began offering the “Douche Burger,” named for the kind of person who would buy a a $666 burger. The bank-account-busting sandwich comes with a kobe beef patty wrapped in a gold leaf, and stacked with foie gras, caviar, lobster, truffles, and imported aged gruyere cheese. It’s seasoned with Himalayan rock salt, and the cheese is melted from the steam of boiled champagne. And it’s literally wrapped in three greasy $100 bills. 666 Burger owner Franz Aliquo said the person who eats it may not enjoy the taste combination, “but it will make you feel rich as f—.”

4. 230 Fifth’s $2,300 hot dog
The famous rooftop lounge in Manhattan offers customers a super expensive hot dog that has thousands of dollars on your typical ballpark frank. This foot-long marvel is made from marbled Wagyu beef that takes 60 days to dry. It’s smothered with white truffle butter, French-imported mustard, and saffron ketchup, then covered in champagne cooked onions, homemade sauerkraut, and (what else?) caviar. Then just sprinkle on some gold leaf. Fortunately, those who buy this expensive wiener won’t just be stuffing their wealthy faces with decadent food. They will also be making a sizable charitable donation to a local food bank with their purchase.

5. Serendipity 3’s $25,000 frozen hot chocolate
The only way to end this meal would be to just eat a gold brick for dessert, right? Well, you’re half-right. This Washington eatery offers one of the most expensive items on just about any menu: a $25,000 bowl of frozen hot chocolate. Just about every ingredient that goes into making this dessert could rack up some serious debt. It’s made from 14 of the world’s rarest cocoas — imported from Africa and South America — and shavings from the $2,500-per-pound La Madeline au Truffle. Then the dessert is accented with edible 24-carat gold and served in an edible gold goblet. The most expensive part is the silverware: a jewel-encrusted spoon worth $14,000.

# # #

THE HAWAII PROJECT


Potato-wrapped Moi at Michel’s in the Colony Surf, Waikiki. $39,000. Seriously? No. However, remember, Moi at one time was reserved strictly for Hawaiian Ali’i, so it just as well could be!

That in mind, I immediately thought of creating a list code named “The Hawaii Project”, of hotels, restaurants and private chefs around Hawaii who have had, or currently offer such stratospherically priced menu offerings.


Alan Wong’s Tempura Ahi Lolipops. $100 each. Seriously? No. However tastes like a million buck$ each!

Hmmm? What did they serve one of the richest men in the world, Mr. Bill Gates and his bride when they were privately wed on the island of Lanai? What was the tab for that braised prime dry-aged tenderloin Kobe beef Alan Wong served President Obama and his entourage while on their annual Hawaiian holiday season vacations?


Chef Alan Wong’s Whole Tomato Salad, featuring his signature Li Hing Mui Ume Vinaigrette. Pricele$$.

With that, please give me time from now to do some serious investigative research, where I’ll talk with hotel and restaurant chefs, managers, staff, as well as media people, family and friends from all over Hawaii to ask this begging question, “Whom have you heard of, seen, and/or experienced that’s served and/or currently offers the THE MOST EXPENSIVE, OVER-THE-TOP DISH in HAWAII?


Kualoa’s Loco Moco: 2 Sunnyside-up farm-fresh organic Kahuku Kalei eggs heaped over 2 Kaa’awa Kiawe-grilled Kualoa Ranch free-range grass fed beef patties and 2 scoops Kahalu’u Gold Rice, then smothered with Kahana Bay Demi-Glace Gravy, along with a side of Punalu’u “Mac” Salad. $80,000.

That’s obviously not as described in the caption, however, imagine “The World’s most expensive Loco Moco”? Seriously!

Well, actually here’s one take on that notion, from Alan Wong’s Pineapple Room in Macy’s at Ala Moana Center…


The Pineapple Room – The “Loco Moco”, $18.50

This is described as such: “Kiawe grilled Maui Cattle Company Hamburger Patty on Fried Rice with two Peterson Farm Eggs any style and Veal Jus. Here’s the Veal Jus…

It would be highly appreciated if you folks, the readers would be so kind to share with us your own experiences either hearing about, seeing, or better yet tasting THE MOST EXPENSIVE, OVER-THE-TOP EATS in HAWAII.

Once all the resources have been gathered (including photos whenever possible) for this code named project, the resulting follow-up will be titled “Hawaii’s Most Expensive, Over-the-Top Eats“. Should be interesting!

*Body copy of items 1 through 5 resourced from: 5 Ridiculously Expensive Restaurant Menu Items – TheWeek.com


2013 Lamborghini Veneno. $4,000,000 (seriously)

39 thoughts on “Most Ridiculously Expensive Restaurant Menu Items: The Hawaii Project

  • March 9, 2013 at 6:50 am
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    As a start scouring the web, here’s the most expensive menu items (which are actually par for the course, for the most part not being ridiculous at all) listed from these well known upscale Honolulu restaurants:

    Hy’s Steakhouse
    Porterhouse T-Bone – King of T-Bones
    34 oz.
    $79.99

    Alan Wong’s
    “Cowboy Steak”
    One Pound Maui Cattle Company Bone-In Rib Steak, Bacon Mushroom Green Bean Salad
    $60

    Russsel Siu’s 3660 on the Rise
    Land and Sea
    Baked Brazilian Lobster Tail, Roasted Tomato Butter Sauce and Grilled Peppercorn Crusted New York Steak,Sauteed Shimeji Mushrooms & Applewood Smoked Bacon, Yuzu Hollandaise Sauce
    $59

    Roy’s Hawaii Kai
    Prixe Fixe Dinner Menu
    58.5 with wine pairing

    APPETIZER PLATE
    Pork Spring Roll, Shrimp Stick, Szechuan Pork Rib
    Pineapple Chili, Wasabi Cocktail
    “Roy’s” Ruggeri & C Prosecco

    ENTRÉE (choice of one)
    Hibachi Style Grilled Salmon
    Citrus Ponzu Sauce
    Fritz’s Riesling

    Macadamia Nut Crusted White Fish
    Maine Lobster Essence
    “Roy’s” Ohana Reserve Chardonnay

    Honey Mustard Grilled Beef Short Ribs
    Roy’s Super Natural Decoy Cabernet

    DESSERT (choice of one)
    Roy’s Melting Hot Chocolate Soufflé
    Rosenblum Cellars, Desiree

    Macadamia Nut Tart
    Domaine de Durban, Muscat

    Beachhouse at the Moana Waikiki
    Beachhouse Tasting Menu
    $90 / $115
    first course ~ baby caesar, sesame crusted ahi, shrimp cocktail
    supplementary course ~ foie gras toast, french baguette, cabernet jus
    main course ~ new york strip, australian lamb chop, maine lobster tail
    dessert ~ hawaiian chocolate pot de crème, macadamia nut carrot cake, vanilla gelato
    wine pairing $32 / $50

    Michel’s at the Colony Surf Waikiki
    Porterhouse Steak
    Prime 22 oz. porterhouse steak, served with creamed & sauteed spinach, white cheddar au gratin potatoes & cabernet reduction.
    $65

    Of course, most high-cost menu items will either say “Market Price”, or won’t list a price at all, meaning, after you pay the bill, cut up your credit card and/or expect sex from your dinner date later that night. LOL!

    Reply
  • March 9, 2013 at 7:33 am
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    That Hy’s steak is incredibly good as are all Hy’s. It is actually quite a buy even when you add an order of angel hair pasta with scallops and creamed spinach. My favorite steakhouse. And what an incredible bar and pupu menu. True sophistication. I have finally convinced my daughter and her GF’s, all foodies and in the Honolulu social scene this is the place to relax.
    Your choice from Michel’s and Siu also gets the thumbs up. Just the ingredients of Siu’s dish here cost just about half the retail. Incredible.

    Reply
    • March 9, 2013 at 7:40 am
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      pat,

      Also consider the size @ 34 oz. That should be enough to feed four people! You should try BLT Steak @ Trump Waikiki. I tell ya’, tender like “buttah”, where you barely need a knife to cut through, just your fork. Seriously! And so, SO FLAVORFUL. Up there with the best steak I’ve ever had.

      I agree, the ambiance at Hy’s is up there with the best in Honolulu. World class. Celebrated my birthday there last year.

      Reply
      • March 9, 2013 at 9:44 am
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        What? You get the BD lunch AND the BD dinner? Wait. I gotta check the rules! :-/

        Reply
  • March 9, 2013 at 7:43 am
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    Pomai, do you know how much a bowl of rice cost in a up scale Asian restauant? My sisters travel to Singapore to this new American fusion Chinese restaurant called Chopsuey Cafe. They charge $3.00 a bowl which to my sisters is fair since Ming Tsai Blue Ginger is maybe that much in US dollars also. But the local Singaporean not happy of it.

    I see people in states are use to up scale price and see we do get what we pay for in things. But in Asia not really they still like good deal but at low price still.

    Reply
    • March 9, 2013 at 7:50 am
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      Kelike,

      Well, consider this: Marukai sells 5 lb. bags of top grade super premium rice imported from Japan selling for $60 each. That works out to $240 for a 20 lbs. bag.

      Reply
  • March 9, 2013 at 7:51 am
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    You also have the Vintage Cave (under Shirokiya) tasting menu at $298 per person which soon will only be available for members at $50,000 or $500,000 membership fees…

    Reply
    • March 9, 2013 at 7:57 am
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      Ryan,

      As always, EXCELLENT recommendation! I shall DEFINITELY try to book an interview with the folks at Shirokiya’s new Vintage Cave.

      Reply
  • March 9, 2013 at 10:04 am
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    Pomai,

    Chef Mavro has a nice little dinner that starts out with a flight of sustainable caviars (4 each caviars served with blinis & crème fraiche (10g each)) paired with champagne as a starter leading into GRAND DEGUSTATION menu paired with “fresh perigord truffles – flown in from france” and wine pairing should run around $567 without tax and tip per person.

    Reply
    • March 9, 2013 at 10:20 pm
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      Ken-San,

      “Fresh Perigord Truffles” is admittedly EXTREMELY foreign-sounding.

      Imagine a Food Network episode of ‘Chopped’, when one of the ingredients in the basket are “Fresh Perigord Truffles”. It would likely happen that one of the competing chefs would drop the ball, not including that key ingredient in their dish. Oh, SNAP! lol!!!

      Reply
  • March 10, 2013 at 1:00 am
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    Pomai, in San Francisco the famous Masa restaurant charge 100.00 for just the steak alone meal. Side dishes are extra. Must be some special steak and give customer a certificate to prove he or her ate that 100.00 steak at Masa.

    Reply
    • March 10, 2013 at 10:24 am
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      Kelike,

      Most high-end steak houses serve their steak ala carte, including here at Ruth’s Chris, Morton’s, Wolfgang & BLT Steak. Hy’s is the exception, where their steaks include the sides.

      Reply
  • March 10, 2013 at 5:21 pm
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    This is not relevant to this particular post, but you should try out the sandwich shop “Spero Spera” one day. When visiting Honolulu, I ate at a bunch of places with the help of your blog :) and really liked this particular sandwich shop because the owners were super friendly and the food was very healthy/high quality/delicious (for being so healthy). It has high ratings on yelp too.
    There is also a Korean hole in the wall restaurant called “Uncle Sim’s” which my sister in law (who is Korean) really enjoyed because it’s homemade and of great quality.

    Love your blog and I miss Hawaii!

    -Unhappy Floridian

    Reply
    • March 10, 2013 at 7:55 pm
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      camille,

      How ironic to learn about a place to eat right in my backyard, from someone who’s visited here that lives thousands of miles away. Thanks for the tip!

      I honestly never heard of Spero Spera until now, thanks to you! Looking over their menu, I am SO on with their Garlic Vegetable Sandwich, made with Garlic, Kabocha Pumpkin, Eggplant, Onions, Sweet Peppers and Skim Cheese. I’ll opt for the side of baby greens with baked carrots and ginger. Dang, that sounds GREAT right about now!

      According to their website, Spero Spera translates to “As long as I can breath, there is hope”. My mantra would be “As long as there is love, there is hope”.

      Reply
      • March 11, 2013 at 6:18 am
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        I really hope you like it! I liked their avocado sandwich a lot. And yes, I definitely visited many restaurants while visiting Oahu for two weeks. I love reading your blog as well as other blogs about Oahu because it reminds me of my visit and childhood (grew up on Oahu in the 80’s). Mahalo and I hope to move there one day… Florida is a flat strip mall of a land and I just miss Oahu’s culture and beauty so much! You are lucky to live in paradise :)

        Reply
        • March 12, 2013 at 12:12 am
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          camille,

          What’s your take on Key West?

          Reply
          • March 12, 2013 at 5:16 am
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            Pomai,

            A few years ago, I traveled to the Key West from Miami hoping to find some natural beauty. At that time, I thought it was quite nice, but overall, it does NOT even compare in the least bit to Oahu. Everything is pretty flat, beaches are mostly man-made, and there is just not much going on… the pictures look pretty, yes, but it’s kind of boring. When I visited Oahu again after many years, I was SO amazed at how beautiful it was.. driving through the North Shore and seeing all the mountains as well as the ocean really does take your breath away. The Key West did not do that for me at all.. I do think if you were to visit a part of Florida, that the Key West area might be one of the best places to visit. People also say that Destin (up in North Florida) is gorgeous, but I was even less impressed. It feels really fake and lacks culture…

            I don’t have many great things to say about Florida honestly. I’m stationed here for 2 more years with my company, but am hoping to move soon.

          • March 12, 2013 at 8:51 am
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            Camille –

            As a Miami girl (well, born and raised, I left in my 20’s), I agree with you about Key West. I actually think Miami is the most beautiful place in FL (I miss driving over the Julia Tuttle Causeway, I miss my office on Brickell Bay Drive, overlooking government cut, toward Port of Miami, with the Manatees swimming under my office window, the art deco, heck, I even miss Calle Ocho) though the west coast is ok (I lived in the Naples area for 2 years). But in general, I agree, it’s flat and boring.

      • March 12, 2013 at 6:32 am
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        camille,

        As soon as you described Key West as being mostly flat and man made, plus on top of that “boring”, I think I’ll pass, unless my trip there is comp’d. If that’s the case, I’ll be better off booking a stay at Mandalay Bay in Las Vegas. Use the extra money in my pocket for a private cabana at their expansive hotel pool. Flat Nevada desert view, no extra charge. ;)

        True, you can get the best of all world’s here on Oahu. You want city life? Honolulu’s up there with LA in fast paced living, complete with all the shopping and nightlife one could want (plus the traffic that comes with that). You want beautiful ocean blue, sun-kissed, sandy beaches? It’s surrounding you just minutes away from any location. You want country? Head out to the north shore or Waimanalo. You want mountains? We got that too.

        It really sounds like you want the “hell out of dodge” from Florida. Yikes!

        So you’re enlisted. Which I’m curious what the statistics are for enlisted military personnel who get stationed in Hawaii end up staying here as a permanent resident after leaving the service. It seems we have quite a large number of residents who did just that. My brother in law is one (Semper Fi). Some get out of the service in part because of just that: they didn’t wanna’ leave Hawaii!

        Reply
        • March 12, 2013 at 12:27 pm
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          Funny that you mention the statistics for military members settling in Hawaii after they are retired! My parents are in the military and were stationed in Hawaii (which is why I spent part of my childhood there!) and they plan to settle there in two years after my Dad finishes his 30 years…probably maui or the big island though because they like less city life and more island life.
          I’m not in the military actually, but I still have to move around quite a bit for my job at Siemens company…not as often as in the military, but still every 5-7 years.
          Haha and I agree about Las Vegas! Definitely beats Florida!

          Reply
    • March 12, 2013 at 12:17 am
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      pat,

      They should have named Uncle Sim’s the “Angry Korean Uncle“. Aptly for the current state of world affairs, it wouldn’t be surprising to find next door “K.J. Un’s Cafe & Hair Salon”.

      Reply
  • March 12, 2013 at 1:57 am
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    Well Beverly Hills neighberhood of Rodeo Drive Mr. Chow Chinese restaurant charge very up scale price for regular food. Many stars like still for it let them enjoy dining there without being bother by fans. High end dining is at Rodeo Drive.

    Reply
    • March 12, 2013 at 6:12 am
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      Aaron,

      Well, as long as the Kardashians aren’t anywhere within 10 miles of Mr. Chow when I’m there, I’m fine with the $100 per person average tab. If ANY Kardashian is in there dining while I’m there? They’d have to pay ME $100 per dish just to get through it.

      In all seriousness (and I was semi-serious above), most upscale restaurants here can run around there if you order a full course meal, including wine and/or champagne. The latter of course where you’ll really get hit. I paid almost near that for for two at Alan Wong’s. The main thing, it was truly worth it, where of course it was at AW’s. It’s hard to justify Chinese food at such lofty prices if its not up to snuff, when Panda Express will always be beating you in the head over it. LOL

      While I haven’t been there yet, back to California’s Napa Valley, a friend of mine had a 12 course prix fixe chef’s tasting dinner at the highly acclaimed French Laundry, which ran $240, not including wine. After several bottles shared amongst the table, he paid $600. He said it was worth every penny. Ounce for ounce, one of the best meals he’s ever had in his life.

      Reply
  • March 12, 2013 at 3:24 am
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    Hey Pomai!

    My nomination is the Combo Plate with extra mac salad and gravy on da rice at Rainbow’s:

    Combo Plate: 7.95
    extra salad: 1.00
    extra gravy: .15
    airfare HSV-HNL round trip: 1,267.41

    Total: 1,276.41

    My wife says going to Rainbow’s is my main reason for coming home to Hawaii… I ALWAYS hit it or the trip home’s not complete….

    Reply
    • March 12, 2013 at 5:33 am
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      Keith,

      Ah, VERY clever! Adding in the cost of airfare to the dish. Not saying that’s cheating, but it’s like that $25,000 Frozen Hot Chocolate from Serendipity 3, where more than half its cost comes from that $14,000 Jewel-embedded 24k Solid Gold Spoon it’s served with. If only Serendipity 3 were a private club, they could have tacked on yet another $50,000 membership fee to the price of that dish, as would anything served at Shirokiya’s new Vintage Cave.

      That really is where concocting such a dish can be a challenge. It’s one thing to add expensive dishware that’s kept, airfare and/or membership fees. Yet I think to truly make it “fair”, the dish’s edible ingredients should be the only element factored in. Speaking of which, I read a few comments on that website’s post, where they were questioning how edible gold leaf is. Can you get sick consuming too much of that? The most priciest edible ingredients that first come to mind being of course, Caviar, Kobe Beef, Lobster and King Crab, Big Eye Tuna, Abalone, Truffles & French Champagne. There’s a bunch more specialty foods and ingredients of course, varying in price from absurd (the better for this applications) to “boutique”. I know there’s some Saffron out there that can get bust a wallet.

      Still, I like the idea that you factored in the cost of airfare flying to Hawaii in the dish. After all, we are isolated in the middle of the “pond”. Shoots, you may as well factor in hotel expenses as well! Don’t forget that hefty hotel occupancy fee, plus tax. Ouch.

      Reply
      • March 12, 2013 at 1:13 pm
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        Pomai,

        Speaking of Saffron, I purchased a bottle $30 of imported pure Spanish Saffron 0.06 oz. net Wt. (1.7g) in none other than the Waianae Grocery Store.

        Sometime I wonder just what people are cooking out here on the Leeward side and is it really as poor as people contend it is. Why would the local grocery store be stocking Imported Saffron??

        We had Coquito’s Restaurant open in Waianae specializing in Latin Cuisine (they fly a Puerto Rican flag on their sign) and the place always has traffic or a filled parking lot. I had a great juicy Cuban sandwich with plantain chips.

        Beaches Restaurant closed and reopened as Crawfish & Crab Shack mimicking the cajun crawfish & crab restaurants that have exploded all around Honolulu.

        The Ka’aha’aina Café part of the campus of Waianae Coast Comprehensive Health Center has a fantastic million dollar water view and has captured a Yelp 4 out of 5 rating serving breakfast & lunch only.

        Now Chef Peter Merriman has moved in to Leeward side Ko Olina with his Monkeypod Kitchen Restaurant at the train station near Roy Yamaguchi’s Roy’s Restaurant attached to the Ko Olina Golf Club.

        Reply
      • March 13, 2013 at 4:25 am
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        Yeah, I made that up to merge this blog with your earlier one on loco moco. I just had a thought: What would it cost for a Nyotaimori meal (“serve (foods) on the female body”, often referred to as “body sushi”, the practice of serving sashimi or sushi from the body of a woman, typically naked) if you got to keep the serving dish?

        Reply
        • March 13, 2013 at 5:40 am
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          Keith,

          In the long run, probably way higher than most men could financially and emotionally afford, and quite possibly, the most ridiculously expensive dish EVER served in the history of mankind. That said, offer to be the dishwasher to pay for the meal. LOL!

          You my friend, have just found the most expensive dish ever prepared, in the form of Nyotaimori, providing you get to keep the “dish”. PRICELESS.

          Dang, a “dish” of nigiri sounds great right about now. :bowl: :-))

          Reply
  • March 12, 2013 at 3:28 am
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    Ai yah! More expensive than I thought! I miscalculated by $ .10! $1,276.51!!!

    Reply
  • March 12, 2013 at 9:09 am
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    Pomai, go figure so Pake my grandmother think saving money shopping in San Francisco Chinatown. She would not eat in any restaurants most of time but bread and sandwich spread in hotel room. Money use to shop in groceries stores for food to take back to Hawaii. It only .25 to .50 cheaper. Plane fare and hotel and time cost more I told her for years. She could buy things in Honolulu Chinatown.

    Found many old Chinese still does that and waste money that way.

    Reply
    • March 14, 2013 at 2:18 pm
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      Ha!Ha!Ha! That reminds me of my husband’s grandmother. When the family visited California, Bachan bought a bag of potatoes that was really cheap. She actually packed it in the suitcase and brought it to Hawaii. My husband still likes to tell that story. But I ask him, how is that different from you buying “two buck chuck” ($2 wine) from Trader Joe’s and bringing it back?

      Reply
      • March 15, 2013 at 2:27 am
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        L,

        A bag of potatoes and “two buck chuck” Trader Joe’s wine on the cheap, only to potentially pay extra to fly it home, taking-up precious luggage space? I don’t know if that’s “Pake”, or more “Podagee”. $10 in “two buck chuck” wine just turned into “thirty buck chuck” wine (do the math, and that should make sense).

        I still don’t get why local folks buy Beef Jerky in Las Vegas to bring back home as Omiyage. Last time I checked, Beef Jerky is sold like EVERYWHERE here, with the best price right at the neighborhood Costco.

        Reply
  • March 15, 2013 at 1:33 pm
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    Pomai, you should an entry of fuguel people habbits. It funny. My grandparents same things bring back from San Francisco all kind food items you get in Honolulu but they said it cheaper. Oh Boy! Really Pake.

    Reply
    • March 15, 2013 at 2:45 pm
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      Aaron,

      That post is currently in the queue. ;)

      Oahu’s Costco locations now sells San Francisco’s Boudin Sourdough bread, except they slice it. Why, I don’t know. They should leave that up to the customer. It’s $6 a loaf, whereas it costs $3 for the same size direct at the bakery in San Fran’ (I brought a whole bunch with me on my last visit there, before Costco started carrying it).

      Reply
  • April 13, 2013 at 8:14 am
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    Fleetwoods on Front Street in Lahaina has a “Hog Burger” on the menu for $35,274.81. It comes with a pound of pure beef, aged cheddar, grilled applewood bacon, Mick’s burger sauce, lettuce, tomato and grilled Maui onion. It also comes with Mick Fleetwood’s personal Harley Davidson Motorcycle.

    Reply
    • April 13, 2013 at 8:23 am
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      Seth, awesome contribution! Huge mahalo for that one!

      Now we need a restaurant on Maui to offer the “Red Rocker Dog”. A 100% Kobe Beef Hot Dog, made by Kobe Bryant himself, complete with a wad of his saliva in mixed in it, topped with the most expensive truffles and caviar money can buy, 100% organic mustard, relish and chopped Maui Onions. All wrapped up in 24k edible gold leaf, served while eating inside a 2014 C7 Stingray Corvette in “Rockin’ Red”, complete with Sammy Hagar’s signature embroidered on the racing leather seats. Which of course, you get to keep the car, including “free” regular maintenance check-ups for the life of the ‘Vette.

      Suggested price for the “Red Rocker Dog”? $1,000,000. Yup. A hot mil’. Not just Sammy’s sig, but Kobe Bryant’s saliva mixed in the Kobe Beef hot dog might be worth that for some.
      :-/

      Reply
      • April 13, 2013 at 5:40 pm
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        The Kobe Dog should come with the diamond ring he plans to use to apologize, the next time he cheats on his wife. That should raise the price north of $10,000,000.

        Reply

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