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Eating Dog & Cat

“After eating dog meat, beef is flavorless”
~ Migration Mark


Just as most Americans don’t give it a second thought eating a hamburger, hot dog, or anything else that involves beef, pork and chicken, people in other countries find it normal to eat bugs, worms and all other kinds of creepy crawly creatures. Some even eat Guinea Pig as a delicacy, such as in Peru. Then there’s outskirt provinces in China, where they eat just about anything and everything as well, including, yup, cats, dogs and rats.

I bring this up after reading “Migration Mark’s” recent post “Have You Ever Eaten Dog (or Cat) Meat? You Might Be Surprised…“, which I found absolutely FASCINATING. Fascinated only after reading how DELICIOUS he said dog tasted. What? Seriously?

Of course at first I was appalled, as well you might be, being that we have 5 precious family dogs of our own that we love very much. Dogs which we don’t even think of as animals or “pets”, but practically as our own children.

Migration Mark has one of the most fascinating blogs I know of, where he does a FANTASTIC job covering food and culture from all around the globe on his perpetual travel-ventures. I highly recommend you head on over to Migrationology.com and go through Mark’s archives. UNREAL! I think he probably got Anthony Bourdain and Andrew Zimmern beat on locales covered. Like, seriously. I discovered his blog through a few comments he’s posted here, as Mark has family ties to Hawaii via his grandparents who live here.


Dog Meat Clay Pot – Photo Courtesy of Migrationology.com


So anyhow, Mark explains while spending time in the Guangxi province of southern China, where he had the opportunity to try dog meat. I know, right now you’re looking at “Snoopy”, telling that cute wittle doggie in a “cutesy” baby voice, “Oh, but NO, I would NEVER eat you.”. But then Mark throws this out, “If Kobe beef is the superlative beef of the world, dog is the crème de la crème of all meat!” Get the hell out. No way! I tell you, if it weren’t for me being on a primarily vegetarian diet, I’d just as well catch the next plane to China to taste for myself what he’s talking about.

Eat Cookies Lose Weight with Smart for LifeOn the other hand, If I never read that, I’d never consider it, as that’s almost like cannibalism to me. But better than Kobe Beef? Now, THAT I have to taste for myself! Or would I? Would you?

Which right from the get-go, you’re probably questioning the ethics of eating dog or cat; something us Americans either casually regard as “pets” to more seriously regard as family members (like us). But what’s really so different about eating what was once a living breathing cow or pig? After all, they’re sentient beings too, right? The debate will never end. Read the comments on his blog for that post, where people really get into the ethical side of this subject.

Mark makes it clear at the start of his article that he’s not getting into the ethics of it, but simply explaining exactly what dog and cat meat tastes like.

“Ethics, shmecics”, for even more shock value, imagine the house sommelier at your table explaining, “With Shih Tzu, I’d highly recommend this vintage Pinot Noir, where its subtly-fruity, earthy, woodsy notes pairs splendidly with such a lean, delicate and petite cut”. Ack!!!!!


Cat Meat Hot Pot – Photo courtesy of Migrationology.com

“The cat hot pot was tasty, but definitely not my favorite meat I’ve tried in this world.”
~ Migration Mark

On to cat, Mark goes on to explain that it tastes “not like chicken at all, it was a light colored red meat – not that deep dark meat like dog.” Continuing on, “It tasted slightly similar to pork, yet full of weird little transparent fish like bones and with an ever so slight tinge of sour aftertaste.”

With that, I’ll happily pass on cat. But the dog tasting “better than Kobe beef” sure rings up the curiosity bell. But nah, personally, I don’t think I could do it. As complicated as my feelings are on this, ultimately it’s psychologically wrong for me. To each their own though!

Read the entire “Have You Eaten Dog (or Cat) Meat?” article here, plus I encourage you to peruse more through “Migration Mark’s” blog. Awesome!

P.S. While I don’t normally record weigh-ins throughout the work week, I’m happy to report I finally busted through into the 187 lbs. zone. Yay!

Pomai’s “Revolution 2012″ weight log**
5.05.12 – 207.0 lbs.
5.27.12 – 195.8 lbs.
6.02.12 – 194.6 lbs.
6.03.12 – 194.0 lbs.
6.09.12 – 191.4 lbs.
6.16.12 – 188.6 lbs.
6.23.12 – 189.8 lbs. (BMI score = 28)
6.30.12 – 188.5 lbs. (BMI score = 27.8)
7.05.12 – 187.5 lbs. (BMI score = 27.7)

Target weight for 7.30.12 – 180 lbs.
Final target weight – 160 lbs.
**5’9″ height, male.

34 thoughts on “Eating Dog & Cat

  • July 6, 2012 at 12:26 pm
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    Maybe Alan Wong can give it a try first. That clay pot does not look particularly appetizing. Now a good cat taco, that is all together a different thing.

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    • July 6, 2012 at 12:28 pm
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      He’d probably make Shih Tzu Wontons or Siamese Nachos.

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        • July 6, 2012 at 3:14 pm
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          Awesome! I didn’t know you were a blogger too. I don’t think I could eat them dog paws. That’s WAY too resembling of what it is. At least mixed in the hot clay pot, you can’t tell what it is. I’d definitely try the scorpion kabobs. Andrew often describes bugs as tasting “nutty”, which I think I’d dig. As long as it doesn’t taste like dirt or “mooshy” bug guts. lol

          Andrew Zimmern visited a Penis restaurant in Beijing on a Bizarre Foods episode covering that city. I wouldn’t doubt Japan has a penis restaurant too, as they actually have a “Fertility Festival” every March called Hounen Matsuri, where huge phallus symbols are paraded around. Read more on that here.

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  • July 6, 2012 at 5:40 pm
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    Pomai, in Vietnam they also does it too. See Youtube on Baby Soup you will be more shock. It enough to not want to eat for a while and lose weight too.

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    • July 6, 2012 at 5:46 pm
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      Exactly the point. I now live vicariously through others eating experiences. Food Network and Travel Channel food shows are now like watching a carnival from a virtual view.

      I don’t think I want to see this “Baby Soup” YouTube video you’re talking about. I might throw up.

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      • July 6, 2012 at 7:29 pm
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        LOL. Me neither. And my father used to cook milk gut on the BBQ and make loko.

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        • July 6, 2012 at 7:35 pm
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          What is “BBQ’d Milk Gut” that makes “Loko”? Whatever it is, it sounds interesting! I think…

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  • July 6, 2012 at 7:59 pm
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    Milk gut is the the intestines of a calf braided for the BBQ. It is roasted and served as a pupu. Very rich. Usually served after a round up. Loko is the Hawaiian name for Hawaiian tripe stew. This is a bit different than modern style. Way more watery, with cleaned out gut added, no tomato. It takes a long time to make. Served in old style paina. A variation is called nioa or sometimes niau. I do not see these dishes much any more. Perhaps I can check out dad’s recipe book and send.

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    • July 6, 2012 at 8:03 pm
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      In a few words, “hardcore old school”!!! LOVE IT! Huge mahalo Pat for sharing with us such in-depth info’!!!

      I’ll ask mom tomorrow about what you’re talking about. Personally, I don’t recall ever eating “Loko”. , which you describe as intestines. Tripe Stew, which is the stomach lining, yes indeed, similar to “Hawaiian-style” tomato-based beef stew, being awesome with poi.

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  • July 7, 2012 at 1:23 am
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    Pomai, are you trying to be the Andrew Zimmer of bloging? This entry can be taken very far indeed. In some part of Taiwan there secret places people go to for monkey brains to eat. If caught owners pay big fine for illness is cause by eating it E bolic that is slow way to die which your body unable to move like prisoner in it for a week and die.

    In China they eat roasted rats which I stay away from. They get their rats from the country not city but still yuk. Northern China they eat donkey meat ect. So Japan in called Sakura Sashimi.

    I saw Youtube on Baby Soup it bad but they did kill baby for it it aborted fetuss sold by doctor to restaurants in Northern China. Very scary indeed.

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    • July 7, 2012 at 4:19 am
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      While not trying to be Andrew Zimmern, I do find extreme food eats entirely intriguing. However, sometimes more reserved than others, where there’s a limit. Like what you described with eating Monkey Brains. Live. Gross. I’d NEVER do that in my right mind.

      Thank goodness I’m now primarily a vegetarian. I feel much better about my health and life in general thanks to that. It’s my Buddhist nature. Nam Myoho Renge Kyo. ;-)

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  • July 7, 2012 at 2:49 am
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    Thanks for the link to migrationology–very interesting and a neat site. I enjoy how your recent posts have branched out a little. Always interesting and fun. Best of luck on your fitness goals. I am very happy to watch your success. I think all of us out here are and are pulling for you. But you know we we love you regardless, yeah?

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    • July 7, 2012 at 4:21 am
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      Whoever “all of us” is (the readers of this blog), and you, I love you too. And yeah, I’m getting pretty cut-up in the process. ;-)

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  • July 7, 2012 at 10:13 am
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    Pomai, pretty heavy entry this one (subject) that is not weight. Been to Asia many times and see every where culture is different. Most places do not eat these strange things because lack of food but just like it . The mountain people of Taiwan like bats roasted and it look like rats when cook too. Korea also eat dogs secret in certain part of country. Vietnam out in open in city an area where people sit around enjoy??!! like food stalls.

    Hawaiian poi dogs not sure is it really dogs or pigs they use but in history Robert Louis Stevenson dine with King Kalakawa on roast poi dogs and and other things.

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    • July 7, 2012 at 4:56 pm
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      I’m not surprised Native Hawaiians in ancient times ate their share of dog.

      Andrew Zimmern ate bat in one episode, which IIRC, he didn’t care for it. The craziest thing Andrew ate on his show, in my opinion, was Bufo Toad in Australia. Yes, the came kind of cane toads we have here in Hawaii. To prepare it, you have to be VERY CAREFUL in not letting the poisonous glands on its neck area get on the “meat”. Totally gross. I’d never eat that. If I want the taste of chicken, I’ll eat chicken. lol

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  • July 7, 2012 at 3:12 pm
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    Pomai, thank you so much for writing this article about your thoughts on this subject! Like you mentioned above, when we actually think about eating dog (or cat) from the roots, it’s not so much different from eating beef or pork. However, when we humans do have emotional connections through pets, it could definitely be disturbing (which is totally understandable and fine)! Thanks again for the great article and for all the mentions, I highly appreciate it!

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    • July 7, 2012 at 4:46 pm
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      My mom became emotionally attached to her neighbor’s “pet” pig, as she pretty much took care of it while they were away at work. However everyone else looked at it as a future Luau FEAST. Ha ha! Ironically, his name was “Kalua”. I kid you not! lol!!!

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      • July 8, 2012 at 3:38 am
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        Hahaha, that’s hilarious! With a name like kalua, it would be impossible not to think food!

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  • July 7, 2012 at 6:27 pm
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    I’m surprised to read about how good dog meat is, because I always assumed it would be dry and sinewy due to the size and shape of most dogs. Logically, I don’t think eating dog or cat is any different from eating pork or beef, but emotionally, I don’t think I could do it. Of course, if I had a pet pig I might not be able to enjoy bacon, either. (Thank goodness I don’t have a pet pig!)

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    • July 7, 2012 at 6:37 pm
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      Pigs are incredibly intelligent, known to be smarter than dogs, and their eyes are almost human-like. I find it baffling that we as humans have embraced dogs as “man’s best friend”, while pigs are high up on our food chain. I really don’t get it. I guess, well, they just taste good, and are relatively cheap and easy to raise.

      On a side note, it’s rather amusing seeing the various Google ads that pop-up with this article based on context. The last one was Pet Insurance. You’re sure gonna’ need pet insurance after reading this! lol!!!!!

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  • July 7, 2012 at 6:46 pm
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    I think I’ll keep Skittles around for a bit longer. She’s a little too skinny and old anyway. lol

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    • July 7, 2012 at 7:03 pm
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      Dig the name! Never thought of using candy names for pets. I’d go with “Snickers”.

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  • July 8, 2012 at 1:40 am
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    Pomai, what next entry going to be? Well I still unable to eat durian is the smell can’t ge past that for the reason. It took years for me to like bitter melon and 1,000 years old eggs also. This entry is about strange meats items so next fruits and vegetables.

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    • July 9, 2012 at 7:04 pm
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      New post is now up, and a refreshing change from this subject, however I still find Mark’s findings on this fascinating!

      Bitter Melon (Goya) is very healthy for you, and known as a contributor to the long life spans folks enjoy in Okinawa. Never tried 1,000 year old egg, but salted duck egg is pretty good.

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  • July 8, 2012 at 6:09 pm
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    Pomai,

    This entry brings back memories of eating local in Vietnam, Thailand, Philippines and Hong Kong!! Never ask what it is made from, especially when people gather to see if you will eat what is placed before you. Ruff, ruff and meow, meow!!!!

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    • July 9, 2012 at 7:05 pm
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      Then I’d just not eat anything that looks like there’s “meat” in it.

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  • July 9, 2012 at 1:54 pm
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    Pomai,
    Australia people eat kangaroo meats and in the south alligator. Paula Deen’s sons love it deep fry.

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  • July 9, 2012 at 7:09 pm
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    Andrew Zimmern said the best part of roast Alligator is the skin.

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  • July 16, 2012 at 12:56 pm
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    So my question for those that have had dog or cat are different breeds or size animals preferred over others?

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  • July 18, 2012 at 5:37 pm
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    I have NO DOUBT different breeds taste differently. Surely their diet must matter too, along with their living conditions (domesticated or wild), as with any other animal meat.

    I don’t recall Mark mentioning exactly what breed of dog and cat he ate. I’ll have to head on over to his blog and ask him. I know he posted a picture of one after it was butchered on his flickr page. If any of you are squeamish about this subject, DO NOT look at those pictures! :-o

    Reply
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